on a dare to / daring / dared / must dare

Paradisaea

New Member
Hungarian
Hello,

I'm trying to find the most concise wording for the concept of an all-encompassing yearning, which has to be powerful enough to dismiss its object itself.
Which of the following is appropriate?

This/A yearning on a dare to dismiss.
This/A yearning daring to dismiss.
This/A yearning dared to dismiss.
This/A yearning must dare dismiss.
This/A yearning must dare to dismiss.

Thanks!
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I don't understand what you're trying to say. I can say that "dare" has nothing to do with "all-encompassing" or "powerful" and your partial sentences don't mention "its object" at all. Can you explain what you mean in other words and also give us a complete sentence as an example?
     

    Paradisaea

    New Member
    Hungarian
    Thank you Myridon, for your reply.

    I can't specify the object because it could be many things a person could long for. I'm talking about a craving, a powerful wish to draw that certain thing, or perhaps any other thing as well, nearer. It is somewhat like a whirpool, where a sinking ship would be destroyed. In order to avoid destruction, this strong emotion has to work against itself by turning itself around in a way: a challenge, that's inherently impossible.
    The attraction must be certain enough in itself, in order to be strong enough to override its very self, and thus "dismiss" instead of attracting. This challenge is what I tried to use the word "dare" for.
    Does any one of those short sentences that I've written describe this concept? Or would you suggest something entirely different?
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Like Myridon, I find your phrases impenetrable. I cannot draw any connection between dismiss and dare from your description.
    Your English is clearly good enough to provide us with sentences. :)
     

    Paradisaea

    New Member
    Hungarian
    Hello e2efour,

    thank you :)

    I mean this in the sense that could one be brave enough to dismiss, to let go of the thing they want the most. In order to end the passive suffering caused by this futile craving, a yearning has to change.
    I guess what makes my writing confusing, is that I didn't mean to restrict the sentence to a person having to change. I try to grasp this from the emotion instead of the person, in a less literal form.

    The yearning needs to be transformed, or transform itself, by overriding its original nature of attracting, and thus start to dismiss and let go instead. As this is hardly possible, and takes a lot of courage, I attempted to use the word „dare”.


    A full sentence could be something like these:
    To end this unbearable emotional state, the yearning must dare to dismiss.
    Change would come from the yearning daring to dismiss.

    Or one of the partial sentences above, as the second half.

    I'm uncertain how to correctly use „dare/ dare to” followed by a verb, when not in the sense of „I dare you...”

    Thanks for your help.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I think it's partly a vocabulary problem. Dismiss is a transitive verb, so the yearning cannot dismiss. It can let go (as you said) or perhaps discharge itself or disperse.
    I also cannot imagine a yearning being brave enough or having the courage to do something.This is something only a person can do.
     
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