On/aboard

  • Jacob1410

    New Member
    India - Hindi & English
    Who's "they?" Was it from native English speakers? for example
    You never gave us the source we always plead for.
    ... but welcome to the forum.:)
    Actually they refers to authority which conducted the exam had published their answer key and it says option B is correct
     

    WestSideGal

    Senior Member
    English, US
    Maybe it's because "they" are referring to a ship which would make "aboard" (a ship) the right-ish answer. Not defending it, just pointing it out.

    For me, personally, either A) or B) as lingobingo stated would be right.
     

    Jacob1410

    New Member
    India - Hindi & English
    So
    No one is going to throw you overboard if you don't say aboard ship. Here are two interesting threads that may be helpful where on a ship is used, (aboard is not discussed)
    https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/sailors-cars-in-or-on-a-ship.1926566/

    https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/in-a-helicopter-on-a-plane-in-a-boat-on-a-ship.1576217/
    So I can definitely object this question. And could anyone please provide "to the point" explanation for the same so I can defend my objection.
    Thank you !!
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    So I can definitely object this question. And could anyone please provide "to the point" explanation for the same so I can defend my objection.
    Thank you !!
    Just tell this anonymous "authority" that a wide selection of well-educated native English speakers says they're wrong.
    If they quibble in whatever language their native tongue might be, refer them to the host of on-line documents using it, such as:

    Queen Elizabeth Overview
    A cruise on the Queen Elizabeth, one of Cunard’s three ocean liners, is a chance to step back into the glamorous hey-day of cruising.
    Cunard's Queen Elizabeth Cruise Ship, 2019 and 2020 Queen Elizabeth destinations, deals | The Cruise Web

    You should know that here on the forum, we frequently deal with problems caused by non-native speakers'quizzes, which is apparently the case here.
     

    Jacob1410

    New Member
    India - Hindi & English
    It's been noticed that the above statement is taken from the novel "the heart of darkness" by Joseph Conrad 1899. There is a dialogue between the characters of this novel.

    So now the point is if someone asks us something like the question as mentione above d, we can't say what the context is so we can't use ABOARD.

    If anyone agree please share your thoughts

    Thank you

    (Pardon my English am not a native speaker)
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    So now the point is if someone asks us something like the question as mentione above d, we can't say what the context is so we can't use ABOARD.
    No, it doesn't mean we can't use aboard. The issue of context in this forum is that we always like to know where text comes from, about which you are asking questions. You should tell us that it came from a test and that no additional context is available (or, in this case, if you know it came from a novel from 1899, that is also relevant information. Another piece of information that may have been interesting is what the other options in the test answers were (apart from "on" and "aboard").

    The test authority's mistake was to assume, just because the original text used "aboard", that that was the only possible correct word to uses there. It is true that in the case of ships, trains, and planes, "aboard" is often the preposition of choice, but this doesn't mean all others are wrong.
     

    Jacob1410

    New Member
    India - Hindi & English
    Thank you Edinburgher
    No, it doesn't mean we can't use aboard. The issue of context in this forum is that we always like to know where text comes from, about which you are asking questions. You should tell us that it came from a test and that no additional context is available (or, in this case, if you know it came from a novel from 1899, that is also relevant information. Another piece of information that may have been interesting is what the other options in the test answers were (apart from "on" and "aboard").

    The test authority's mistake was to assume, just because the original text used "aboard", that that was the only possible correct word to uses there. It is true that in the case of ships, trains, and planes, "aboard" is often the preposition of choice, but this doesn't mean all others are wrong.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    We used "on" when I was in the Navy. "Request permission to come aboard" is the only way I remember hearing that word used.
     
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