On account of my special interest

Rise up

Senior Member
Español
Hello to everybody!

I would want to know if this sentence is correct or if it is not possible to use "on account of" to start a sentence.

Subsequently, on account of my special interest in Languages, I chose....

Thanks in advance!!!
 
  • JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    A full sentence would be helpful, as would some context. What are you planning in using this in, Rise up? On account of is being used correctly (as far as I can tell), but for me, it's a pretty casual-sounding expression. There are contexts where I would use it, but contexts that I would not.
     

    Rise up

    Senior Member
    Español
    I want to use this phrase in a formal cover letter that I am going to send to the Human Resources Manager of a company where I want to work.

    The complete sentence would be: "Subsequently, on account of my special interest in Languages, I studied a Philology Degree."

    I only chose that word because on the Wordreference Dictionary says it is formal. However, by your comment, I guess that actually it isn't and therefore I should change it.

    Would it be better to say:?

    "Subsequently, due to my special interest in Languages, I studied a Philology Degree" ? (I think this is not really formal, please correct me if it is!)

    or maybe:

    "Subsequently, owing to my special interest in Languages, I studied a Philology Degree" ?
    "Subsequently, by virtue of my special interest in Languages, I studied a Philology Degree" ?

    Thank you in advance!
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I don't really like any of the options you've provided.

    "On account of" is closest to your meaning, but I agree with JustKate that it sounds casual.

    "Due to" and "owing to" sound as though you're blaming your interest in languages for your choice of degree.

    "By virtue of" is just wrong.

    I would say "Subsequently, because of my special interest in languages, I obtained a degree in philology." (We don't say we "studied" a degree. If I had entered the degree program in philology but not actually completed it, I would say "I studied philology.")
     
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