on/at/as at 31st December

irene.acler

Senior Member
Italiano
Good morning :)

I have a doubt in the following sentence:

Participation in warehouse physical inventory procedures: raw materials, goods in process and finished products on 31st December 2011.

I found different options for the underlined phrase:
- on 31st December
- at 31st December
- as at 31st December.

But which is the right one? Or maybe more than one can be ok?

Thanks in advance for your help!
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    In annual reports, I usually run across these two:

    American way:
    raw materials, goods in process and finished products as of 31st December 2011.

    British way:
    raw materials, goods in process and finished products as at 31st December 2011.

    Now I don't know that these are really American and British, or if it's just the American reports I see and write use "as of" and many of the British firms request/require "as at," so I'm just recording my experience.

    I thank you can also simply use on, but I wouldn't just use at.

    I have no doubt that there will be other opinions. :)
     

    Lyndon

    Banned
    N/A
    You 'count' the stock / inventory on the specific day.
    In the financial reports you state the value of the stock, not as it is now, but as it was at that specific moment -- i.e. as at 31st December 2011. "...as at ...' is the standard phrase used in financial circles. (BE)

    Speaking more loosely, we might say 'Stock at December was higher than stock at June' because, in colloquial speech, certain words are assumed to be included even when they are not actually spoken. :)
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Speaking more loosely, we might say 'Stock at December was higher than stock at June' because, in colloquial speech, certain words are assumed to be included even when they are not actually spoken. :)
    For comparison, we would say "Stock in December was higher than stock in June" in American English.
     
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