<on/at> New Year's Eve

emma.learns

Senior Member
Chinese - China
Dear all,

Which preposition should I use? <On/at> New Year's Eve.

For example, in the following sentences:

In China, people have a custom to stay up <at> the New Year's Eve until midnight.

I think this is why people have the custom of having dumplings <on> New Year’s Eve.

I'm not sure whether they are correct and I don't know when to use which.

Thank you!
 
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  • emma.learns

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    Tough to say without knowing what the complete sentence is.
    Sorry, thought it's always the same.

    In China, people have a custom to stay up <at> the New Year's Eve until midnight.

    I think this is why people have the custom of having dumplings <on> New Year’s Eve.

    I'm not sure whether they are correct and I don't know when to use which.

    Thank you!
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    In China the custom is to stay up until midnight on New Year's Eve might be a slightly better way of putting it.

    I think this is why the Chinese * have the custom of having dumplings on New Year’s Eve.

    It's not 'people' who have that custom, but the Chinese.

     
    Last edited:

    Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    I think in general, we use "on" to mean the exact day when a festival is celebrated and "at" to mean the general time around the festival, that is, from a couple of days before the festival to a couple of days after it but I wonder whether "at" could be used in such a sense with "New Year's Eve" because "(on X's) eve" is a very specific time reference,:confused: but then I suppose it can be.

    On Christmas = on 25th December
    at Christmas = during the Christmas week/ during the days around Christmas including the Christmas day

    Please do correct me if I'm wrong.
    Thanks a bunch.
     
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