"On lips your breast promotes geometers"

bloomcountry

Senior Member
Russian, Spanish
Could you paraphrase the following line? I am not sure if "lips" is the part of the mouth or the "rim" of something:

"...a bee
Hums with his million-times-repeated stroke
On lips your breast promotes geometers
To measure curves, to take the height of mountains,"

At this point, the poet has not introduced the "your" to the reader yet. Aldous Huxley's "Lines" from Brief Candles.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It would be a woman's lips: bees hanging on beautiful lips for honey, and 'bee-stung lips' were common poetic conceits. However, I can't make the sentence grammatical. I think it needs a semicolon after 'lips': looking at the full text, it has a group of clauses divided by semicolons, and the next part beginning with 'your breast' seems complete in itself.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    "Your breast promotes geometers To measure curves, to take the height of mountains" would seem to be separate from "on lips," but unfortunately it's hard to tell. Can you provide a link to a page with the full text?
     
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