# on musical sheets -- hashtag or sharp?

< Previous | Next >

Disneyesque

Senior Member
Korean 
I've heard that a person called #s on a musical sheet 'hashtags'. It was the first and the last time I've heard somebody call them so.
Is that a dialect to call them 'hashtags'? Or do you think that was just for fun intended?

ex) There are 4 hashtags at the very beginning of this sheet. What major is this in?
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi princess_cm

    It must have been a joke - not least because the two symbols are different:). Here's Wiki on the subject of the # symbol:
    The symbol is easily confused with the musical symbol called sharp (♯). In both symbols, there are two pairs of parallel lines. The key difference is that the number sign has true horizontal strokes while the sharp sign has two slanted parallel lines which must rise from left to right, in order to avoid being confused with the musical staff lines. Both signs may have true vertical lines; however, they are compulsory in the sharp sign, but optional in the number sign (#) depending on typeface or handwriting style.
     

    Disneyesque

    Senior Member
    Korean 
    Hi dear Loob :)

    For the speaker is an Irishman living in London, I thought it could be a dialect of Ireland or London. Lucky to know the fact that he was actually joking.
    Also, I've never known that they're actually different in the ways to draw. I always drew this and that.

    Thank you always.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Note that a hashtag is different from a hash symbol.

    #...........is a hash sign/symbol

    #wordref............is a hash tag. The hash is '#' and the tag is 'wordref'
     

    Disneyesque

    Senior Member
    Korean 
    Thank you! :) The speaker used the word 'hashtag'. And it was on Twitter- so it was definately a joke, I reckon!
     

    primale

    Member
    American English
    I've played guitar for five years and study music theory and can say with confidence that "sharp" is an outdated and no longer used term. "Hashtag" is the correct term for # in music, signifying that you are playing a certain note one pitch higher (a half note higher than the original note).

    I'm kidding, this post made me laugh so hard. # is always called "sharp" in music and "pound sign" when relating to phones. It's a joke that it's even called hashtag, derived from the word "hash" which is what it was called BEFORE phone's came along.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I

    I'm kidding, this post made me laugh so hard. # is always called "sharp" in music and "pound sign" when relating to phones. It's a joke that it's even called hashtag, derived from the word "hash" which is what it was called BEFORE phone's came along.
    You speak AE, I don't. We Brits never call it the pound sign. And the one on my mobile phone is a hash symbol.;)
     

    primale

    Member
    American English
    You speak AE, I don't. We Brits never call it the pound sign. And the one on my mobile phone is a hash symbol.;)
    Really? Ah, I give wrong information as a joke initially, and then I give it by accident...sorry about that. Nonetheless, you taught me something new, so thank you! So many names for one little sign...

    Sharp, hash, pound sign, TIC-TAC-TOE...and now "hashtag".
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    and now "hashtag".
    No, not hashtag (except in your friend's joke). Note the point Biffo made in #4. A hashtag is a tag (i.e. a name) that begins with the hash symbol. This whole name is called "hashtag", because it begins with a hash symbol; the hash symbol itself is not called "hashtag".
     

    bing181

    Senior Member
    English (Australian)
    ... # in music, signifying that you are playing a certain note … (a half note higher than the original note).
    A half tone or a semitone higher. A half note is a duration, not a pitch, equal to two beats. Also known as a minim.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top