on my part it is leaving aside a great deal

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(page 435, chapter 19) by DH Lawrence (planetebook,here):
(background:Connie said she didn't want to live in Wragby any more and she said Clifford really didn't need her. Then Clifford said…)

‘Pardon me! I don’t change. For my part, since you are my wife, I should prefer that you should stay under my roof in dignity and quiet. Leaving aside personal feelings, and I assure you, on my part it is leaving aside a great deal, it is bitter as death to me to have this order of life broken up, here in Wragby, and the decent round of daily life smashed, just for some whim of yours.’

The part in blue is a little confusing to me. Now I paraphrase it as:
(It is) leaving aside (my) personal feelings(=leaving aside personal feelings), and indeed(=I assure you), for me(=on my part), I leave aside a lot of personal feelings(=it is leaving aside a great deal).

Is that right please?
Thank you in advance
 
Last edited:
  • Bondstreet

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    .
    It means that his personal feelings towards his wife and the maintenance of the routine of daily life are equally important to him. Even if he did not love his wife, the second reason would be important enough for him to strive to maintain the status quo.
    .
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Leaving aside personal feelings, and I assure you, on my part it is leaving aside a great deal, = If I dismiss my personal feelings, and to be frank, for me, those comprise a very large part of what I would be dismissing ...
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thanks a lot. But this sentence seems to have nothing to do with the context in logic, so why did Clifford mentioned it please? And did Clifford advocate laving aside personal feelings or object to it?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "Leaving aside personal feelings, and I assure you, on my part it is leaving aside a great deal," is simply a preamble to what he intends to say - It could be omitted, but Sir Clifford is giving some background to what he is about to say.

    He neither objects to leaving aside his feelings, nor does he think it is a good thing.

    He is describing his feelings prior to making his main point/objection which is "it is bitter as death to me to have this order of life broken up, here in Wragby, and the decent round of daily life smashed, just for some whim of yours.’

    "Leaving aside personal feelings, and I assure you, on my part it is leaving aside a great deal," is an example of the literary rhetorical figure of speech "Apophasis": "Mentioning something by reportedly not mentioning it" (See Apophasis - Wikipedia) e.g.
    "I will not say how angry I am and today you have made me angrier".

     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Now I feel Clifford implies: if I were you, I would have dismissed so many of my feelings that the life order could be kept well.
    "Leaving aside personal feelings, and I assure you, on my part it is leaving aside a great deal," is simply a preamble to what he intends to say - It could be omitted, but Sir Clifford is giving some background to what he is about to say.

    He neither objects to leaving aside his feelings, nor does he think it is a good thing.

    He is describing his feelings prior to making his main point/objection which is "it is bitter as death to me to have this order of life broken up, here in Wragby, and the decent round of daily life smashed, just for some whim of yours.’

    "Leaving aside personal feelings, and I assure you, on my part it is leaving aside a great deal," is an example of the literary rhetorical figure of speech "Apophasis": "Mentioning something by reportedly not mentioning it"
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Now I feel Clifford implies: if I were you, I would have dismissed so many of my feelings that the life order could be kept well.
    No. He is saying "Even If I were to disregard the personal feelings that are causing me a lot of sadness and stress - it is still as bitter as death, etc."
     
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