On New Year's Eve + at night = ? [Eve = evening or whole day?]

u-1

Senior Member
Japanese
Good evening,

I really need your help!

I want to combine these two ideas into one phrase:

"On New Year's Eve" + "at night"

Is it OK to say "on the night of New Year's Eve"?

How about "at the night of New Year's Eve" ?

Thank you!
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, with 'on'. We say 'at night' on its own, but change to 'on' when it's specified which night: on Wednesday night; on the night before Christmas.
     

    Juhasz

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Perhaps I am alone in this - I have just discovered that numerous dictionary entries define "eve" as the day or night preceding an event - but I only think of eve as evening. To my ear, "the night of New Year's Eve" sounds as silly as "on the night of the night before New Year's Day." I'm guessing this is the older meaning of eve, which I can't imagine coming from anywhere other than evening, but it could also be that, because Jewish holidays always begin at sundown, I never understood how non-Jews perceived New Year's (or any other) Eve.
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    "Eve" for me refers to the entire 24 hours of the day named. It does not sound at all odd for me to say "on the morning of Christmas Eve, I went to pick up my aunt and uncle at the train station", or "on New Year's Eve, the staff goes home early, and the office closes at 3 P.M."
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I'm OK with the idea that Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve begin early in the morning, and I have used them with this meaning. But it is hard to take away from either expression the sense of evening - and of course a lot of the important events associated with both happen in the evening/night.

    Despite that, I feel a small twinge of discomfort when I hear "... on the night of New Year's Eve ...", or perhaps "... on New Year's Eve night ...". Maybe that's just because context very often makes the time of day clear so that it is not necessary to use such a phrase. I would like to see the full sentence u-1 wants to use.
     

    u-1

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you everyone! Your comments helped me a lot! Thanks again.

    When I posted my question here, I didn't have a specific context in mind, but let me see... How about this?

    In Japan, people eat soba (buckwheat noodles)on the night of New Year's Eve to wish for longevity.

    I was born on the night of New Year's Eve.


     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I have fewer reservations about 'the night of New Year's Eve', so your sentences are fine for me. We do say things like 'New Year's Eve is a university holiday' here, and that clearly refers to the entire day. In Hong Kong 'Chinese New Year's Eve' is a pubic holiday and offices are shut on the day.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I'm accustomed to "New Year's Eve" being used to mean just 31st December, and thus I don't see lunchtime on New Year's Eve, or on the night of New Year's Eve, as being any sort of contradiction.
     

    shop-englishx

    Banned
    Urdu
    <This thread has been merged with an earlier thread.>

    Hi,

    Does 'Eve' in "New year's Eve" refer to the whole day of 31st December or just the night of 31st December?

    By 'Eve', I mean it to be 'Evening' (New year's evening?), but I think I'm wrong.

    Please enlighten me one this, and sorry for my ignorance. :oops:

    Thanks a lot. :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    shop-englishx

    Banned
    Urdu
    Thank you, Copy.

    Do you mean the whole day plus the whole night of 31st December? Please tell me why there is 'Eve' in "New year's Eve"? Is it a short form of 'evening'? and, if this is 'evening', it should only be the evening of 31st December, not the whole day or night, right?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Shop-englishx, could you scroll up to the beginning of this thread? The earlier posts address your question.
     

    shop-englishx

    Banned
    Urdu
    Thanks, I have read that. :), but there is one thing that's confusing me is that when we mean 'eve' to be the short form of 'evening', why then we take it to mean the whole day of 31st December?, why not just the evening/night?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    You're assigning just one of the meanings to "eve" – there are more. From the Random House Unabridged: eve:

    1. (sometimes cap.) the evening or the day before a holiday, church festival, or any date or event:Christmas Eve; the eve of an execution.
    2. the period preceding or leading up to any event, crisis, etc. On the eve of the American Revolution.
    3. the evening.

    Of course, because "eve" can mean both "day" and "evening," there will be some confusion – if that's a concern, you'll need to make it clear in your Christmas Eve invitations: "Join us for caroling on Christmas Eve – we'll meet at our home at 7pm." Or "Join us for breakfast on Christmas Eve."
     
    Last edited:

    S.Tan

    Member
    English (British) & Chinese/Hokkien
    Usually the preposition in is given to the noun evening with the definite article the, ie. in the evening;

    however, if you specify what evening it is, eg. on the day before New Year would be on the New Year's Eve; on the day before Christmas would be on Christmas Eve; on 2 Jan would be on the evening of 2 Jan.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    however, if you specify what evening it is, eg. on the day before New Year would be on the New Year's Eve; on the day before Christmas would be on Christmas Eve; on 2 Jan would be on the evening of 2 Jan.
    "... on the New Year's Eve" doesn't sound quite right to me, especially as a general rule. I can see "On the New Year's Eve before last, ..." but it would have to be a specific New Year's Eve.
     
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