On paper or newspaper

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quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
On/In paper/newspapers, false advertisements will use small/fine print/prints so that people won't notice it/them and read it/them.


Which word beside each slash should I use? Thanks?
 
  • WongFeiHung

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In newspapers, false advertisements will use fine (small can work too) print so that people won't notice and read it. (two 'it's' are redundant)
    "fine print" is a pretty common set phrase --- "Read the fine print" or something like that - you wouldn't say 'small print' here
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    Or alternatively:

    In newspapers, false advertisements will use small print so that people won't notice it (the small print) and read them (false advertisements).

    The term "the fine print" is generally reserved for legal contracts. The common phrase when speaking of printed material (books, papers, etc.) is "small print."
     

    Orange Blossom

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    Many advertisements have fine print. Fine print refers not only to the size but the fact that there are details included in that print. The fine print could actually be in a large font and still be called fine print.

    Credit card advertisements, cell phone ads, club membership - such as book clubs, music clubs, flower clubs, etc. - are just a few examples of ads that have fine print. The fine details do indeed include legal information, but the topic isn't necessarily legal paperwork. Television and radio advertisements put the fine 'print' in a softer and faster speech.

    Orange Blossom
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    Many advertisements have fine print. Fine print refers not only to the size but the fact that there are details included in that print. The fine print could actually be in a large font and still be called fine print.

    Credit card advertisements, cell phone ads, club membership - such as book clubs, music clubs, flower clubs, etc. - are just a few examples of ads that have fine print. The fine details do indeed include legal information, but the topic isn't necessarily legal paperwork. Television and radio advertisements put the fine 'print' in a softer and faster speech.

    Orange Blossom
    Hi, or it is just different between AE and BE, which is what my dictionary defines.
     
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