,on speaking and writing

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sunyaer

Senior Member
Chinese
These are sentences I made up myself.

1. "I would like you to start working with a student who is planning to write the IELTS test, on speaking and writing."

2. "You can ask anybody who has the printer installed on their computers, to print the document for you."


Are these two sentences correct with a comma in sentence 1 before "on speaking and writing" and in sentence 2 before "to print the document for you"? Would it be OK to omit the comma?
 
  • Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    I'm with Greyfriar: I think it's better to omit the comma.
    Especially in #2:
    The relative clause "who has [a] printer installed on their [computer]" is a restrictive clause: it is necessary in order to limit the meaning of "anybody".
    A restrictive clause goes without commas, while a nonrestrictive clause goes between two commas.
    With a single comma, it looks as if you couldn't decide whether the clause was restrictive or nonrestrictive.
     

    sunyaer

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I wrote this announcement to staff in the company:

    “On Thursday, all printers except the one named 250 HP on the second floor will be shut down for maintenance. If you must print something on this day, and you DO NOT have this printer installed, please ask someone who is configured to use it, to print your document for you.”

    Is the comma in “…use it, to print your document…” needed? It would be confusing without the comma, wouldn’t it?
     
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