on the flag was embroidered the Turkish crescent

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
crescent
a representation of a crescent used as an emblem of Islam or of Turkey:
on the flag was embroidered the Turkish crescent

OED

What does this word order mean? Why is it used? It's usual in Russian, but in English?
Thank you.
 
  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    This is typical inversion, used for poetic effect. It should be used sparingly in English, and almost always only in formal situations.

    If you're really interested in inversion, here's a page that gives lots of examples with discussion (however, they are difficult examples).
     

    ESustad

    Senior Member
    English - (Minnesota)
    It's correct in English, but unusual. If you invert every sentence this way, you'll sound like the Yoda character in Star Wars. (I wonder if his loopy syntax is replicated in dubbed versions of the trilogy.)
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    This is typical inversion, used for poetic effect. It should be used sparingly in English, and almost always only in formal situations.

    If you're really interested in inversion, here's a page that gives lots of examples with discussion (however, they are difficult examples).
    Oh, of course, I know about inversion, but I didnt' know this is a "typical" inversion:
    3(on the flag) 2(was embroidered) 1(the Turkish crescent) = 1(the Turkish crescent) 2(was embroidered) 3(on the flag)

    Thank you, everybody.
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    It's just S / V / P => P / V / S.

    You can expect to see a lot of weird things happen with syntax: "On the flag the Turkish crescent was embroidered" would also be possible, as would "Embroidered on the flag was the Turkish crescent." In formal/rhetorical writing and speech these kinds of manipulations happen all the time.
     
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