On the lake, I sensed a feeling of isolation.

Cholo234

Senior Member
American English
<<On the lake, I sensed a feeling of isolation.>>

Is it redundant to say "I sensed a feeling (of something)"? I think so, but I'm not sure. My guess is that "I sensed isolation" is a better option.
 
  • Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    I tend to think of "sensed a feeling of.." to mean "I sensed that someone else had a feeling of.." See this example from the Macmillandictionary "He sensed a feeling of profound sorrow in her voice"
    I don't think I would use "sensed" but "felt" e.g. He felt (completely) isolated"
    I might say something like "a sense of isolation washed over him"
     

    Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, we really need some context. If the feeling of isolation is in someone else, the sentence might work.
    In the 1980s, I was on Lake Erie in a private fishing boat and felt its immensity. Always within eye distance of the shore, I nevertheless sensed a feeling of isolation, which was not a reassuring feeling.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I agree with Franco-filly that your phrase implies a distance we would express only when talking about someone else. When talking about your own feelings, "I had a sense of isolation" or "I felt isolated" would be more customary.
     
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