on the news at 9:00 <next>

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
TV announcer: Good evening. WDOL with a late breaking report. Eddie Caputo, repeated accomplice of Charles Lee Ray, has just escaped the Michigan Avenue precinct. More details to follow on the news at 9:00 next.
Child's Play, film

What is "next" here for please?
Thanks.
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    To indicate that there is not any other program between the current one and the news :eek:
    We have no time context - it could have been said a 7:30 after the movie started at 7 and it tells us the movie ends just before the news.
    What is your problem with this word?:D It simply says the news is the NEXT program(me)
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Or it's an ellipsis from - "which is the next program" in which case it would be an adjective :D
    Would you say "next" in the OP acts exactly like these ones (adjectives)?:)
    I shall be 26 years old on Friday next.
    I’m seeing him on Tuesday next.
    The ceremony will take place on Monday next.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    It's not the same usage.

    "Next" in the old-fashioned usage "on Friday next" means "next Friday," not "on Friday, which is coming up next."
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    More details to follow on the news at 9:00 next.
    This is not a correct sentence. You would not write this sentence. The normal sentence ends with "9:00", and then the announcer says "next" as a single-word comment. As someone points out above, that "next" means "the news (which I just mentioned) is next". And "next" means "after the current show, on this channel".

    TV advertisements use anything that works: they aren't required to follow English grammar. And this entire 4-sentence annoucement was an advertisement, trying to convince viewers to stay on this channel when the current program ends, so that they can hear "more details" about the news event. This kind of announcement (pre-announcing some details) is called a "teaser".
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    This is not a correct sentence. You would not write this sentence. The normal sentence ends with "9:00", and then the announcer says "next" as a single-word comment. As someone points out above, that "next" means "the news (which I just mentioned) is next". And "next" means "after the current show, on this channel".

    TV advertisements use anything that works: they aren't required to follow English grammar. And this entire 4-sentence annoucement was an advertisement, trying to convince viewers to stay on this channel when the current program ends, so that they can hear "more details" about the news event. This kind of announcement (pre-announcing some details) is called a "teaser".
    Applies to many announcements - even the news itself sometimes :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top