on the ramp butt to belly

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by alicip, Jun 14, 2013.

  1. alicip

    alicip Senior Member

    Formello-Roma-Italia
    Italiano ITA-Romeno ROU-Inglese AmE
    Mi potreste dare una mano a tradurre la seguente:
    "The soldiers then crowded on the ramp butt to belly."
    I soldati sono su un aereo cargo in attesa di lanciarsi col paracadute.
    Io ho provato così:
    "Poi i soldati si ammassarono sulla rampa all'estremità della pancia dell'aereo."
     
  2. maxbat2002

    maxbat2002 Senior Member

    Rome, Italy
    Italiano
    :) "butt to belly" è una forma di affollamento "at right angles" rispetto a "shoulder to shoulder"...
     
  3. alicip

    alicip Senior Member

    Formello-Roma-Italia
    Italiano ITA-Romeno ROU-Inglese AmE
    Quindi dovrebbe essere: "si ammassarono uno dietro all'altro" ?
    Oppure: "si affollarono uno dietro all'altro piegati in avanti"?
    Oppure: "si ammassarono rannicchiati uno dietro all'altro"?
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2013
  4. Mary49

    Mary49 Senior Member

    Padova
    Italian
    Ma sarebbe una sorta di fila indiana piegati?
     
  5. MR1492

    MR1492 Senior Member

    Bowie, MD
    English -USA
    If I can offer some help, "butt to belly" describes how the people are lined up. They are in column. That is, all are facing in the same direction, one behind the other. Plus, they are very close together. Therefore, the are described as "butt to belly."

    butt = ass = culo
    belly = stomach = pancia

    Hope this helps.

    Phil
     
  6. Mary49

    Mary49 Senior Member

    Padova
    Italian
    Ciao, Phil,
    this would be in Italian "fila indiana compatta".
     
  7. alicip

    alicip Senior Member

    Formello-Roma-Italia
    Italiano ITA-Romeno ROU-Inglese AmE
    Thank you Phil. Based on your precious suggestions I have managed to come up with a possible translation:
    "Poi i soldati si ammassarono in fila sulla rampa."
    or:
    "Poi i soldati si ammassarono uno dietro l'altro sulla rampa."
    Reference:
    ammassarsi = to crowd
    in fila = in a line
    uno dietro l'altro = one behind the other
    What do you think?

    Grazie Mary. Quindi:
    "Poi i soldati si ammassarono in una fila indiana compatta sulla rampa."
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 14, 2013
  8. MR1492

    MR1492 Senior Member

    Bowie, MD
    English -USA
    Thank you, Mary. Interestingly, many years ago in AE we also used the term "Indian file" to describe people walking in line. However, with the rise of "politically correct" speech over here, you don't see written or hear spoken terms like that much anymore.

    Just a word to the wise if you travel over here!

    Phil
     
  9. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    Just a word to the wise if you travel over here! :tick: (or if you're writing for an American audience!)
     
  10. Matrap

    Matrap Senior Member

    Abruzzo, Italy
    Italiano
    Phil, Joanne. I know it's off topic but why "Indian file" is considered politically incorrect today? Who should feel offended?
     
  11. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    It's a good question and I don't think it's off topic because Italians should know (in contexts like the one we're talking about in this thread) we don't say "Indian file." I'll give my opinion and Phil can come in with his point of view. First of all, the word "Indian" is no longer used to refer to the original inhabitants of the continent. They would be Native Americans. And second, we tend to avoid the use of ethnic stereotypes, so even "Native American file" would be seen as somehow disrespectful. :)
     
  12. Gianfry

    Gianfry Senior Member

    Brighton, Uk
    Italian
    Exactly. Since people of any ethnicity do line up that way, there's no reason to make a reference to "Indians": it might appear like a way of diminishing their identity...
     
  13. MR1492

    MR1492 Senior Member

    Bowie, MD
    English -USA
    I agree with Joan and Gianfry on the "political correctness" of not using the term "Indian" as it is potentially demeaning. These days, it all depends upon who has the political clout to make a fuss when they feel oppressed. However, we still use the term "Dutch treat" to describe going out with a friend and each person pays their own way. I suppose the Dutch should be protesting more but they're generally nice people. :)

    Phil
     

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