(on) this/that afternoon

az_april

New Member
Japanese
Which aren't correct?

1. I'm sadder this afternoon.
2. I'm sadder on this afternoon.
3. I was sadder that afternoon.
4. I was sadder on that afternoon.
5. I said I was sadder this afternoon.
6. I said I was sadder on this afternoon.
7. I said I had been sadder that afternoon.
8. I said I had been sadder on that afternoon.

The original line is 'I'm sadder on this lonely afternoon.' In this case, does 'lonely' want 'on'?
 
  • az_april

    New Member
    Japanese
    Sorry for my poor English. When you put an adjective/s between 'this' and 'afternoon,' do you put 'on' before 'this'?
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello az_april, and Welcome to the Forum! :)

    Good question.

    We almost never put 'on' before 'this afternoon'.

    We occasionally put 'on' before 'that afternoon'.

    With any luck, there'll be some experts along in a minute to explain why. :)

    >> When you put an adjective/s between 'this' and 'afternoon,' do you put 'on' before 'this'?

    1. I'm sadder this lonely afternoon. (not in plain English - too poetic)
    2. I'm sadder on this lonely afternoon. (maybe)
    3. I was sadder that lonely afternoon. (maybe)
    4. I was sadder on that lonely afternoon. :tick:
    5. I said I was sadder this lonely afternoon. (I don't think so)
    6. I said I was sadder on this lonely afternoon.
    7. I said I had been sadder that lonely afternoon. :tick:
    8. I said I had been sadder on that lonely afternoon. :tick:

    That was a difficult exercise, in my opinion. I doubt that everyone would agree with my answers. Let's see. :)
     

    az_april

    New Member
    Japanese
    Thank you very much for your answer.:) It seems the rule isn't clear perfectly even for you.

    I'd like to ask a further question about 'this afternoon' in a more confusing situation. In a novel, the first person is remembering about the specific afternoon. She (the first person) was talking with a man. She explains what she was talking. It isn't in the form of conversation, but she (in the present time) explains alone. She explains she said (something like) if she had been different, she would have been doing (something unrecommendable) 'on this (adjective) afternoon.' (That adjective is another question for me and confusing here so I googled to get another simpler sample and found the sentence I used in the first post.)

    I don't think this 'this' means 'today' but 'the very time I was being in' and maybe 'on the topic,' too, and am confused.

    If no adjective were put there, do you think whether 'on' would be needed, (be more natural, might be put...) or not?

    (It's just a question from my impulse for exploration of the English grammar.)
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    >> I don't think this 'this' means 'today' but 'the very time I was being in' and maybe 'on the topic,' too, and am confused.

    I think it's unclear. I would like to see the original text, along with some supporting context. Remember to name your source.
     
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