on/to this pitch

  • Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    "Pitch" here is short for sales pitch (which is made to a prospective customer)—so yes, on or in or with would work, but not "to".
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    One question: what would the "in" mean here?
    to put our best foot forward in this pitch -- I can't just get an image of it...
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I used the words "put forward" in relation to pitch to explain the way "in" is used here. In conveying the pitch to the customer.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    For what it's worth, I only use "on this pitch" in this context: We have to put our best foot forward on this pitch.

    Other prepositions would work in other contexts.
     
    Last edited:

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I used the words "put forward" in relation to pitch to explain the way "in" is used here. In conveying the pitch to the customer.
    But the meaning has also changed, hasn't it? One thing is when the object of "in" is "pitch", another thing is when it's "putting forward" itself.

    cross-posted
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I wasn't rephrasing the original sentence. I was trying to answer your question in Post 6 where you asked what "in" means, after hearing that it could be an alternative to "on".

    Think of it as "in making this pitch", if putting forward sounds confusing.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Ah, I see, you probably mean that this is sort of an elimination:
    "to put our best foot forward in (making) this pitch"...
    ... not like put the foot forward [where?] in this pitch...
    But, the original "on" here has its main meaning, yes? Like "step on something" (figuratively), right?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    At this point, it might be useful for future readers to give some meanings of pitch (n.)
    1. a field or area upon which sport or a game is played.
    2. sales-talk; a strategy [and its implementation] for inducing someone to buy something or act in a certain way.
    3. the action of throwing a ball usually at a target
    4. tar or bitumen.

    The sense of the example is 2.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "To put your best foot forward" is an idiom for "to do your best, to do as well as you can". There's no actual foot movement or stepping being referred to.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    "To put your best foot forward" is an idiom for "to do your best, to do as well as you can". There's no actual foot movement or stepping being referred to.
    Yes, that's an idiom. But also, it has its implied literal meaning (which is not used, of course). I thought that "on" or "in" belonged to this phrase in the same way as "forward" does.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    One question: what would the "in" mean here?
    to put our best foot forward in this pitch -- I can't just get an image of it...
    I don't think there's a image here to see, Vik.
    "pitch": 2. sales-talk; a strategy [and its implementation] for inducing someone to buy something or act in a certain way.
    "put one's best foot forward": to make one's best effort.

    (These expressions have long since sloughed off their associated images).

    Then, all you need is a preposition to link them. I chose 'in' because I consider the pitch as a scenario, or set of scenarios, in which the various actors will be playing their roles to the best of their abilities. However, as you've seen, other prepositions are available, and the choice of preposition can often tell you something about the underlying thought processes of the speaker.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I agree with Beryl that there's probably not an image to see here – and that the choice of preposition will tell you something about the speaker. :) I've been in advertising a long time and have only ever heard "on this pitch" in the context of your original sentence.
     
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