on Tuesday p.m. [a.m. / p.m. without time]

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Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I know a.m and p.m can be used with time like 5:30 or 6:00(I'm sorry. I don't know how to refer to this time) to mean in the morning or in the afternoon but can they be used without them?

"The match is on Tuesday p.m."

Thoughts and context: I told my friend the match will be held on Tuesday afternoon.
 
  • 8thnote

    Senior Member
    English-Southern US
    Hello, my friends,

    I know a.m and p.m can be used with time like 5:30 or 6:00(I'm sorry. I don't know how to refer to this time) to mean in the morning or in the afternoon but can they be used without them?

    "The match is on Tuesday p.m."

    Thoughts and context: I told my friend the match will be held on Tuesday afternoon.
    I would just say "The match is Tuesday afternoon". Or, you could say "the match is on Tuesday in the p.m." but that sounds kind of odd and wouldn't be used much by a native speaker.

    "The match is on Tuesday p.m." is not correct.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I would just say "The match is Tuesday afternoon". Or, you could say "the match is on Tuesday in the p.m." but that sounds kind of odd and wouldn't be used much by a native speaker.

    "The match is on Tuesday p.m." is not correct.
    Do you mean we often omit on in the sentence The match is on Tuesday p.m.?
     

    SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    Just make sure you don't say: "The match is on Tuesday at 3 p.m. in the afternoon". :D
    (Some people do, believe me).
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Hello, my friends,

    I know a.m and p.m can be used with time like 5:30 or 6:00(I'm sorry. I don't know how to refer to this time) to mean in the morning or in the afternoon but can they be used without them?

    "The match is on Tuesday p.m."

    Thoughts and context: I told my friend the match will be held on Tuesday afternoon.
    Sometimes AM and PM are used without a time - but they are not used after a day, like "Tuesday PM" or "January 12th PM". They are used with "in the", like "I do not usually go out in the AM".
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    The abbreviations am and pm are also found in written (informal) contexts to stand for 'morning' or 'afternoon'. I might write in my diary 'Meet John Tues am' - but I'd read it out as 'Meet John Tuesday morning'. At my university, we have set exam times: 9-11am, 1-3pm and 5-7pm. In the exam timetable, the first slot is AM, the second PM and the third EVE.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    The abbreviations am and pm are also found in written (informal) contexts to stand for 'morning' or 'afternoon'. I might write in my diary 'Meet John Tues am' - but I'd read it out as 'Meet John Tuesday morning'. At my university, we have set exam times: 9-11am, 1-3pm and 5-7pm. In the exam timetable, the first slot is AM, the second PM and the third EVE.
    Do people tend to omit the preposition 'Meet John on Tuesday morning' and The match is on Tuesday p.m? I ask the latter question in 3# but get no replies.:D
     

    8thnote

    Senior Member
    English-Southern US
    Do people tend to omit the preposition 'Meet John on Tuesday morning' and The match is on Tuesday p.m? I ask the latter question in 3# but get no replies.:D
    At least in the US, we often do omit the preposition, especially when speaking informally (such as talking with friends or family). It's typically not done in written English though.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I omitted it because it was a diary entry. I informal spoken English, on can be left out. In a more formal, written setting, I would always write on ('We will me meeting John on Tuesday morning'). I believe American style allows for its omission in this setting too.
     

    8thnote

    Senior Member
    English-Southern US
    I omitted it because it was a diary entry. I informal spoken English, on can be left out. In a more formal, written setting, I would always write on ('We will me meeting John on Tuesday morning'). I believe American style allows for its omission in this setting too.
    As an American, I would never leave out the preposition in my writing. Only in informal speech.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I omitted it because it was a diary entry. I informal spoken English, on can be left out. In a more formal, written setting, I would always write on ('We will me meeting John on Tuesday morning'). I believe American style allows for its omission in this setting too.
    As an American, I would never leave out the preposition in my writing. Only in informal speech.
    Got it. Thank you very much.
     
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