on which he can count

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SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
The guerrilla fighter, on the other hand, must analyze the resources which the enemy has for trying to achieve that outcome; the means in men, in mobility, in popular support, in armaments, in capacity of leadership on which he can count.
(Guerrilla Warfare; Ernesto "Che" Guevara)

Does which refer to all the means (in men, in mobility...)?

Thanks.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The guerrilla fighter,[...] must analyze the resources which the enemy has [...]; [...] in the capacity of leadership on which he [i.e. the enemy] can count.

    Therefore which = the capacity of leadership
     

    SuprunP

    Senior Member
    Ukrainian & Russian
    The guerrilla fighter,[...] must analyze the resources which the enemy has [...]; [...] in the capacity of leadership on which he [i.e. the enemy] can count.

    Therefore which = the capacity of leadership
    Thank you, PaulQ.

    But I'm afraid I don't see 'the' before 'capacity'. Would you be so kind to expand on it?
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    It seems to me that 'which' refers to all the means mentioned, for two reasons.
    The linguistic or grammatical reason is that the five factors mentioned following 'means' are each linked to 'means' by the word 'in', showing that they are parallel cases, which stand on the same footing in the sentence. The factual or semantic reason is that the second half of the sentence is intended to explain 'the resources which the enemy has for trying to achieve' his aim. The second half still makes good sense, and the structure becomes clearer, if we leave out the five individual factors and read it as 'the means...on which he can count'.
    It seems natural to see this phrase as the explanation of 'resources', and the individual factors as the components which go to make it up.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I agree with wandle: I also see the basic structure of the second part of the sentence as "the means ... on which he can count".
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Thank you, PaulQ.

    But I'm afraid I don't see 'the' before 'capacity'. Would you be so kind to expand on it?
    The is required before capacity. (My mind has gone blank... It sounds wrong without it - capacity requires a qualifier, he used it correctly in "the means in men".)

    Mr Guevara is enumerating the considerations that a guerilla fighter must take into account when the enemy takes an initiative:

    The guerilla fighter, on the other hand, must analyse the resources which the enemy has for trying to achieve that outcome;
    (i) the means in men,
    (ii) in mobility,
    (iii) in popular support,
    (iv) in armaments,
    (v) in capacity of leadership on which he can count.


    The first 4 points are obvious and are unqualified. You can count the men, you can assess the transport and logistics, you can estimate popular support, you can know the level of armaments.

    The final one (v) is qualified by on which he can count. The he is the enemy [leader] and he counts on his armed forces' capacity of leadership.

    I
    suspect Mr Guevara is saying that the guerilla leader should make all efforts to know the capabilities of persons of rank in the enemy's armed forces There will be varying capabilities within the armed forces (ranging from idiots to brilliant generals.) The guerilla leader must know which of the enemy's leaders is doing what and where.

    Obviously, if you know a useless general is guarding a bridge, that is a better target than a brilliant general in a town loyal to the enemy.

    Thus the guerilla leader will be interested in the capability of the leadership of those who are loyal to the enemy - i.e. on which he (the enemy) can count.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Paul, I would read it like you if there were a the before capacity -- but there isn't!

    So for me, it has to be:
    The guerrilla fighter, on the other hand, must analyze the resources which the enemy has for trying to achieve that outcome;
    the means...
    (i) in men,
    (ii) in mobility,
    (iii) in popular support,
    (iv) in armaments,
    (v) in capacity of leadership
    ... on which he can count.

    :)
     
    Last edited:

    Valvs

    Senior Member
    Russian
    For what it's worth, I checked the original in Spanish, and it says "...the means on which [he] counts/relies in men... " (the translation is mine).
     
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