Once you sign the contract you will be working for them

Fbohn21

Senior Member
Deutsch
Hello.

I am wondering about the differences between the two sentences below:

Once you sign the contract you won’t be working for them.


Once you sign the contract you are not working for them anymore.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Once you sign the contract you will be working for them.
    Once you sign the contract you are working for them.

    The present tense can be used to express (usually, but not always, the near) future. Essentially there is no difference.

    The present tense however gives more immediacy to the action.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    The present tense in the first verb doesn't work for me: logically, she has to have signed the contract first in order to be contractually employed by them.

    I think you need the perfect tense there:
    Once you've signed the contract you'll be working for them. :)
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    The present tense works for me, since we can use the present tense to refer to future events, as mentioned above. Since it is a consequence which immediately and automatically follows the referenced action (signing the contract), the consequence can be considered to be in the immediate future.

    I agree with PaulQ that there is a subtle difference in perspective between the two, but there is no difference in meaning.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The present tense in the first verb doesn't work for me:
    Hmmm... the signing and starting to work for them are simultaneous.

    "Once" -> as soon as

    "Once you have the mixture ready, pour it into the bowl."
     

    Fbohn21

    Senior Member
    Deutsch
    Hello.

    So according to you explanation I CAN use the continuous tenses after once.

    Now I’ll try to explain to you what i think about the following sentences.


    Once you stop spending money, you can buy more things, because you are not constantly spending any money.

    —> refers to the moment I stop spending money.

    Once you stop spending money, you will be able to afford more things, because you won’t be spending money constantly.

    —> only refers to the future.

    As soon as you get into the habit of doing sports, you will be running around all the time, because you body isn’t/ won’t be holding you back.

    Which one should I use “your body isn’t holding you back/won’t be holding you back.”
     

    Fbohn21

    Senior Member
    Deutsch
    <Threads have been merged at this point by moderator (Florentia52)>

    Hello.

    I am sitting in the car with my driving instructor.

    I ask him:

    Can I go slower when I am entering the highway?

    He says:
    Absolutely not. As soon as you/Once you go slower, you are blocking other people’s way.


    I think “you are blocking” works better than you “will block” correct?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    As soon as you get into the habit of doing sports, you will be running around all the time, because you body isn’t/ won’t be holding you back.

    Which one should I use “your body isn’t holding you back/won’t be holding you back.”
    In that one I'd use the future continuous for the final verb, to match the second one: you're talking about two things that will both be happening together in the future:
    "... you'll be running around all the time because your body won't be holding you back."

    Can I go slower when I am entering the highway?
    He says:
    Absolutely not. As soon as you/Once you go slower, you are blocking other people’s way.

    I think “you are blocking” works better than you “will block” correct?
    I'd use the future continuous in that one too:
    "Once you go slower, you'll be blocking other peoples way" Because you won't (hopefully) be blocking their way until after you've started going slower. :)
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Once you stop spending money, you can buy more things, because you are not constantly spending any money.

    —> refers to the moment I stop spending money.

    Once you stop spending money, , because you won’t be spending money constantly.

    —> only refers to the future.
    No.
    Once you stop spending money is a time phrase and indicates some time in the future. Basically it is no different from "on Tuesday".

    You can buy is the present tense used to express an action in the future. (This is a standard feature of English)
    You will be able to afford more things (I have no idea why you have changed the verb!) This is the simple future.
     

    Fbohn21

    Senior Member
    Deutsch
    I was just wondering because I read this online written by a native speaker:

    I recommend that all learners use backshifting whenever possible. “Once you get into this habit, you can speak more fluently because your brain is not wasting time trying to figure out if you should be using the present or the past.”


    Why does he use “your brain is not wasting”?
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    That is a different usage, because he is making a general statement - the “you” is anyone who gets into the habit, and he therefore uses the present to refer to the general case. This is different from the earlier example which was talking about the future of the listener in particular. He uses the present continuous because he is referring to something which occurs at the same time as speaking fluently. He could also have used “doesn’t waste” : both would work here, and mean the same thing.
     

    Fbohn21

    Senior Member
    Deutsch
    That’s what I thought too. So it is possible to use “doesn’t waste”

    So what I could say is:

    Once we (anyone) stop spending money on clothes, we can buy houses or cars, because we are not consuming things we don’t need.

    Would you interpret this as a general rule.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Fbohn21

    Senior Member
    Deutsch
    No. I am not looking for a rule anymore. I was asking whether that would be understood as a general statement or instruction
     
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