One beer a day, doesn't make your belly swell. TWO DOES!

birdman

Senior Member
Taipei, Taiwan
I am going to send this sentence to one of my friend who drinks more than he should and is gaining weigth. Is the secnod part correct? Can I say it that way?
 
  • birdman

    Senior Member
    Taipei, Taiwan
    Yes, of course. We are more than good friends. And I rephrased it into "Two beers a day makes your belly sway" as it rhymes and he still will get my point.
    :)

    Thank you.
     

    Jigoku no Tenshi

    Senior Member
    Venezuela-Castellano
    I think it's right, but shouldn't it be "TWO DO"?, because two are plural so I think it should be "do" and not "Does"
    And now that birdman rephrase it, I ask, shouldn't it be "make"? for the same reason, two beers a day as a subject is plural isn't it?
    Well it's a funny kind of informal saying so I think grammar it's not that important now but I really want to Know if I'm right or I'm not

    Hope it helps, if not, please help me!
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    imithe
    Of course it should be "two do".
    However, I would be very slow to send this message to anyone - friend, family of whatever!
     

    toddkelly

    New Member
    English, USA
    It should be TWO DOES. You are referring to a rate of 1/day or 2/day, so it is a singular concept.

    Like saying the following:

    Driving 1 mile per hour doesn't break the speed limit. 75 DO!

    Doesn't make sense. It's not a grammatically correct sentence either way, though right? lol, i'll never be a copy editor. Darn. Or is it copy-editor, or copyeditor? Arghhh.
     

    birdman

    Senior Member
    Taipei, Taiwan
    I think it should be singular as here "two" is short for "two beers a day." It is this thing that makeS your belly swell and not just two beers now.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    I think it's right, but shouldn't it be "TWO DO"?, because two are plural so I think it should be "do" and not "Does"
    Quantities, when seen as a unit, are singular.

    Twenty litres of milk is enough for 100 cups of hot chocolate.

    Five beers is enough to make her drunk.
    but
    The five beers she bought are lined up in front of her.

    A quantity of money is always singular.
    Twenty-five euros is a lot to pay for one pizza.
    But individual notes/coins are plural.
    There are twenty-five one-euro coins on the table.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top