One bottle of Coca-Cola

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
********************
Supposed that when travelling I stop at the front of a small grocery store in the countryside of the US and tell the man sitting in the store: "Give me one bottle of Cocacola."

Source: English senario making practice by me.

The expression "Give me one bottle of Cocacola" is my translation from Chinese to English.

The question of this thread is whether the use of the word "bottle" is idiomatic in this way.
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Yes, that's good.

    Some people would say "a bottle of". But "one bottle of" is okay: it emphasizes how much Coca Cola you want.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Supposed that I stop at the front of a small grocery store in the countryside of the US and tell the man sitting in the grocery: "Give me one bottle of Cocacola."
    It is a grocery shop, right? Even in the smallest local neighbourhood grocery shop (and our shops generally tend to be smaller than American stores) drinks are kept cold in fridges of the respective brand and people have free access to those. And if it is a shop or a store, the person there is a salesperson, not a bartender.

    And then, Coca Cola (as well as Pepsi cola, Schweppes, etc.) comes in bottles, but they come in sizes. And they all are placed on shelves to which, most likely, you have access, too.

    My point is, you will most likely be told, maybe even rudely if you do not use 'please', to go get what you want and come back to pay for it. :)

    And even if the salesperson agrees to 'give you one bottle of Coca Cola', you will still have to specify the size of the bottle. In Europe you can choose between 250ml (glass), 500ml, 750ml, 1l, 1.5l, 2l, sometimes 2.25l and 2.5l :)
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    So it is at your discretion. If the salesperson is just standing by the fridge and ready in your service, tell him "A coke please" and he'd skillfully fetch the coke for you. The Chinese request, if translated more directly regardless of grammar, is "Come bottle Cola." (Google translates it as "Come on bottle of cola!")

    If the store has Coca Cola and Pepsi Cola, the salesperson will raise a bottle to show you and hand it to you at your nod.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In the US, grocery stores have cashiers, not sales people. You might ask an employee "Where is the Coca-cola?" and get the reply "Aisle 12" and that will be all the help you get. In your situation in #10, you're likely talking to someone whose entire job is to put things on shelves. He'll point and say "It's right there."
    Regardless of grammar, your translations in #10 seem to have you talking to the bottle, not the "salesperson."
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    We still have those very small groceries where there is a person behind a counter who weighs cheese and wraps it in paper and cuts off a piece of salami for you and then takes your money. But such shops are disappearing fast and even there the drinks are in fridges to which everyone has access and they will not come around the counter to give you a bottle of Coke. As Myridon says, they will just point at the fridge and if at all they open their mouth, it will be to simply say "Over there, help yourself" (and that not even in English :D )

    I did not see any such shops in the US, but I did not roam the countryside extensively while I was there. :) Do you have such mini stores in the US?
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    We still have those very small groceries where there is a person behind a counter who weighs cheese and wraps it in paper and cuts off a piece of salami for you and then takes your money. But such shops are disappearing fast and even there the drinks are in fridges to which everyone has access and they will not come around the counter to give you a bottle of Coke. As Myridon says, they will just point at the fridge and if at all they open their mouth, it will be to simply say "Over there, help yourself" (and that not even in English :D )

    I did not see any such shops in the US, but I did not roam the countryside extensively while I was there. :) Do you have such mini stores in the US?
    Yes, there are such stores, even in large cities. A deli in a large city (such as New York) has a large supply of cheese, salami, sausage, prepared foods, etc. behind the counter, and you ask the person behind the counter for the amount you want. Similar stores, though with less food behind the counter, are bodegas (in Spanish-speaking cities this has become a word that English speakers use) and general stores (or country stores) that are often at crossroads in small villages in otherwise rural areas. But, as you say, the drinks are in fridges, and a new customer who has never been in the store would ask "where's the Coke?" as you and Myridon say, and get "Over there" in return.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Drinks are definitely a "serve yourself" item. You might select a bottle or can of Coke out of the many sizes and flavours available and take it to the front and pay for it. The one item that I can think of that is routinely kept behind the counter is/are cigarettes. There you would ask for a specific pack. "I'd like a pack of Marlboro Golds, please." I think "a" is more likely than "one".

    That's the polite version. In everyday transactions where speed is more important and no one cares, customer or cashier, "Give me a pack of Marlboro Golds"/"Can I get a pack of Marlboro Golds" would suffice. The politeness would be in the matter-of-fact tone. It's a request, not a demand. There is no question mark.

    This is standard for drinks. You pick your own:
    x1538438507046.jpg.pagespeed.ic.bx6bHIYT39.jpg
     
    Last edited:

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    Drinks are definitely a "serve yourself" item. You might select a bottle or can of Coke out of the many sizes and flavours available and take it to the front and pay for it. The one item that I can think of that is routinely kept behind the counter is/are cigarettes. There you would ask for a specific pack. "I'd like a pack of Marlboro Golds, please." I think "a" is more likely than "one".

    That's the polite version. In everyday transactions where speed is more important and no one cares, customer or cashier, "Give me a pack of Marlboro Golds"/"Can I get a pack of Marlboro Golds" would suffice. The politeness would be in the matter-of-fact tone. It's a request, not a demand. There is no question mark.
    Agreed. A polite but business-like tone of voice is sufficient in a busy situation; one can be polite without vocalizing the sound 'please.' Having worked behind a counter (even recently) it doesn't bother me if people don't say 'please', so long as they speak nicely and don't use a "Get me this! Now!" tone of voice.
     
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