One of the longest ___ of any - Is it logical?

jkerchek

Member
Cantonese
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I am watch a history show. The presenter says
George III ruled for 60 years - one of the longest reigns of any British monarch.
I feel she wants to compare the duration of George's ruling to all other monarchs.
But she has already said he is one of the longest, is 'of any British monarch' still necessary?
If he is the longest, then 'one of the' is redundant.
What does this 'of any British monarch' try to say?
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    There might be other kingdoms where a monarch reigned longer. Adding "of any British monarch" makes it clear that the comparison is restricted to British monarchs, not all monarchs.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    No. "...of any..." takes the singular. Think of it as "...of any one/single..."

    "He was the most controversial Commander-in-chief of any U.S. president."
    "This was by far the worst experience of any date I've ever had."
    "She will be the most accomplished athlete of any gymnast who has competed for Olympic gold."
     

    xuliang

    Senior Member
    Chinese Mandarin
    No. "...of any..." takes the singular. Think of it as "...of any one/single..."

    "He was the most controversial Commander-in-chief of any U.S. president."
    "This was by far the worst experience of any date I've ever had."
    "She will be the most accomplished athlete of any gymnast who has competed for Olympic gold."
    This is different from what I learnt. I think it should be "She will be the most accomplished athlete of any gymnasts who have competed for Olympic gold." Right? "who have competed for olympic gold" is to describe "any gymnasts".
     

    jkerchek

    Member
    Cantonese
    Would it be more precise to say
    "George III ruled for 60 years - one of the longest reigns in the British monarchy"?
    or
    "George III ruled for 60 years - one of the longest reigns of British monarchs"?
    I simply don't understand how any works here
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    This is different from what I learnt. I think it should be "She will be the most accomplished athlete of any gymnasts who have competed for Olympic gold." Right? "who have competed for olympic gold" is to describe "any gymnasts".
    That's different, I think, and incorrect.

    "She will be the most accomplished athlete of any gymnasts who to have competed for Olympic gold."
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Would it be more precise to say
    "George III ruled for 60 years - one of the longest reigns in the British monarchy"?
    or
    "George III ruled for 60 years - one of the longest reigns of British monarchs"?
    I simply don't understand how any works here
    I'll probably get shot down in flames for this, but I think it should be "one of the longest reigns of all the British monarchs."
     
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