one of the three players <to score> <who have scored>

bennyfriendly

Senior Member
korean
I have made up the example below.

(1) John is a talented soccer player in the local club, which has been running for eighty years. He is one of the three players to score at least seventy goals in a season in club history.

My non-native English speaking friends think "to score" is wrong. So, they rephrased it, as shown below.
(2) ..... He is one of the three players who have scored at least seventy goals in a season in club history.

Who is correct? Please give me your feedback. Thank you very much for all your help.
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I prefer the infinitive version (which means deleting the definite article), but you need the perfect infinitive, “to have scored”. Presumably the meaning is that he’s one of only three players in the whole of the club’s history to have scored seventy goals or more in a single season.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Hmm... I see nothing wrong with "to score". A Google search for "one of the few to score" will pull up a convincing number of examples.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Of course, it’s fine. But I don’t think it works well in this sentence about the history of a club – at least, not as it’s written at the moment.
     
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