one team, one life, one love

BajenForever

New Member
Swedish
Hi,

would really appreciate help(easy for you guys I guess :)) with this translation to Latin. It is with regards to a soccer team and I would like to be dead sure on the phrasing as I am doing a painting with this included. I do not trust the online translators!

ONE TEAM, ONE LIFE, ONE LOVE -> Latin

Thanks a lot in advance.

BR
/Daniel
 
  • Scholiast

    Senior Member
    Welcome to the Latin Forum.

    My suggestion:

    una factio, una vita, unus amor.

    If you want it in epigraphic style, it would be upper case, thus:

    VNA FACTIO, VNA VITA, VNVS AMOR.

    You are quite right not to trust online translation-programs. For inflected languages, they are dreadful.

    Σ
     

    BajenForever

    New Member
    Swedish
    Thanks a lot! So nice and helpful of you to provide such a fast answer.

    I will plan for this translation and hopefully provide you with a picture of the result.

    Thanks again and take care
     

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    But what's the intended meaning of this phrase? I would understand the Latin una factio, una vita, unus amor as “there's only one team, only one life, only one love (the rest are false etc.)” – as with some well-known monotheistic mottoes. English, on the other hand, normally uses this to express unity, commonality & inclusion, which is especially clear in the Rastafarian one love. With a sports team, presumably it's only the team members that the love is common to, although I'm not quite sure what to do with “one life”. In any case, this usage has no parallel in Latin AFAIK.

    Additionally, what's the purpose of the translation? Is this a metalanguage game, where the real motto is in English, and the reader must successfully decode (transverbalise) the Latin to arrive at that English motto? Because this would call for a close adherence to the original. Or is the Latin supposed to be understood on its own terms, without reference to English? Which would call for idiomatic Latin.

    You seem to be a native Swede – how would you translate it into your language?
     

    BajenForever

    New Member
    Swedish
    Hi,

    I am out in such deep water here as I barely can express myself in my native tongue Swedish in a correct way :)

    I was planning to go with "una factio, una vita, unus amor" as my customer seems to accept it, dont really know where his acceptance comes from though, probably Google :)

    Here maybe you guys can help me out even more. Idiomatic Latin seems to me the way to go in a painting/picture that people will look at? The painting consists of many parts, the soccer team, the supporters and a domestic area of Stockholm where the team comes from.

    The customer already has a phrase he wants: "fortis in fidelitas" which I guess means something in the line of strong in faith/bravery?

    "presumably it's only the team members that the love is common to" - When you ask I see what you mean, the original phrase I asked about(ONE TEAM, ONE LIFE, ONE LOVE) is not correct even in English :) I would have this is Swedish:

    "En klubb, En livstid, En kärlek"

    That in English would maybe better be expressed:
    "One Club, One lifetime, One love"

    Hopefully this gives a bit of more insight, as said I suck at languages etc in general.

    Thanks for the attention, hopefully I can get it done correctly :)

    BR
    /Daniel
     

    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    Greetings once more

    fortis in fidelitas is ungrammatical. At the very least, it would need to read in fidelitate. And as it is celebrating a team, you might prefer the plural fortes.

    Σ
     

    BajenForever

    New Member
    Swedish
    Greetings once more

    fortis in fidelitas is ungrammatical. At the very least, it would need to read in fidelitate. And as it is celebrating a team, you might prefer the plural fortes.

    Σ
    perfect and thanks, then I sorted an other issue that was not known to me!

    BR and take care
     

    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    saluete omnes!

    I should have added (in my last post, # 6) that for once I disagree with the illustrious Sobakus, who...
    would understand the Latin una factio, una vita, unus amor as “there's only one team, only one life, only one love (the rest are false etc.)”
    Idiomatically, this does not feel right to me: the implicit stress on 'only' (in English) appears to me more concordant with the (rhetorically potent) adjective solus than with the cardinal numeral unus.

    Σ
     

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    saluete omnes!

    I should have added (in my last post, # 6) that for once I disagree with the illustrious Sobakus, who...

    Idiomatically, this does not feel right to me: the implicit stress on 'only' (in English) appears to me more concordant with the (rhetorically potent) adjective solus than with the cardinal numeral unus.

    Σ
    Salvē optume Scholiastē!

    The reason for the difference in my interpretation is the difference between the two languages. Namely, English has both these senses and it's the “one common to many” meaning that's clearly implied at least with “team” and “love”. However, I don't think I've ever seen Latin ūnus used in the sense commūnis, and so I don't belive it has that sense at all; while the meaning “only, sole, single” is its primary meaning when not used as a numeral or as an indefinite “some(one)”, f.ex.:

    ūnum hoc sciō “there's (only) one thing I know for certain”, tū ūnus ex omnibus “you alone among everyone else”, vir ūnus tōtīus Graeciae doctissimus “the single most learned man in all of Greece”.​

    English one isn't used like that any more, but a remnant of such usage is seen in the very adjective only < one+ly.

    Conversely, the Latin sōlus is less the equivalent of “only, single”, and more that of “(a)lone, in the absence of others”. Although it's true that either one can often be used, sōlus is not only more peremptory, but less idiomatic as well.

    Therefore, while in English one can contextually decide between these two meanings, in Latin the only interpretation that seems possible here is “only, sole, single”.
     

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    As for my own suggestions, judging by the customer's fortis in fidelitas, the quality of the Latin is among the least of their concerns. And since you say you would accept "En klubb, En livstid, En kärlek" as a translation, which I'm convinced doesn't express the same sentiment as the English (granted, I'm still not 100% sure what sentiment it's supposed to express), perhaps we shouldn't bother ourselves too much with this and go with Scholiast's original suggestion.

    But if I were to suggest one improvement, it would be to consider if factio is the right choice here, since it encompasses more than just the members of the team, but, being something rather political, has a connotation of division and taking sides as opposed to that of unity. I would be tempted to go for turma, which is originally a horse troop, a squadron, and by extension any body of people seen as acting in concord and unison.
     

    BajenForever

    New Member
    Swedish
    Hi,

    yes lets end it here as I am sure it will be more than good enough. I now understand how difficult this really is!

    I will go with "una turma, una vita, unus amor" and "fortes in fidelitate" as suggested.

    And I cant thank you experts enough for the prompt and excellent help!

    BR
    /Daniel
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    I, maybe due to being a Neolatin descendant, can't help but seeing factio as a political term and turma as a military one.

    I wonder whether sodalitas wouldn't be closer to that sense conveyed in the word 'team', as the term refers to societies made by mates with a purpose, focusing more on celebrating and on the bonding among them.
     

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    I, maybe due to being a Neolatin descendant, can't help but seeing factio as a political term and turma as a military one.

    I wonder whether sodalitas wouldn't be closer to that sense conveyed in the word 'team', as the term refers to societies made by mates with a purpose, focusing more on celebrating and on the bonding among them.
    While your description seems on point, what's being described here is a sports competition team, while sodalitas is about civil societies, clubs of people joined by common goals or interests, or even simply circles of friends, very much like En. “society, club, association”. It can't be applied to sports or competition on general, unless it's an association of different teams; on the contrary, turma seems like the optimal choice for this. The goal of a sports team isn't bonding, but prevailing in competition.
     
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