One Ukrainian local dialect almost identical to Croatian?

Gavran

New Member
Croatian - Croatia
Hello everybody. (My first post! Yay!)

I'm trying to verify an old story a friend of mine told me. Back in the old(ish) days he was a member of a student exchange organisation and travelled a lot. One of the places he visited was Ukraine. So he said that on one particular trip, after they crossed the border, they entered a bus. The driver talked to them in what sounded like almost straight Croatian but it turned out it was his local dialect, that this dialect is inexplicably similar to Croatian and that people in that particular (sub)region speak it normally.

Probably everybody is aware of this, but for the record, Ukrainian and Croatian are as different from each other as two Slavic languages can be.

Here comes the mythic element of the story. This happened a ong time ago. He was (obviously) a student at the time with priorities being: fun, company, alcohol, more fun, some more alcohol. Not "getting to know weird aspect of foreign cultures". I tried to pry information out of him but he has no clue where exactly this was, not even which country they were entering Ukraine from.

Does anyone have any idea if there is any sense in this? Original Croats most probably arrived from what is today western Ukraine and a part of that region is called "Bijela Hrvatska", but since then languages have mutated very much so I can't think of a simple explanation for this. Apart from alcohol, but they were on the road and apparently sober at the time.
 
  • Gavran

    New Member
    Croatian - Croatia
    Dankešen :) But I have a feeling this particular event happend very near the border and the map ther shows that all those areas are well inside Ukraine.
     

    Gavran

    New Member
    Croatian - Croatia
    Hm, ok, some new revelations here. I had a conversation today and it turns out it was a region next to Hungarian border, in Trans-Carpathia. Incidentally, I'm going there in August and will be able to verify firsthand.
     

    Easy Tiger

    New Member
    Crimean Tatar
    The infamous Rusyn dialect of Ukrainian spoken in Carpathian region where the Hungarian border is, it does somewhat differ from ordinary Ukrainian and does resemble Serbo-Croatian more than Ukrainian does, and that's where croats considered White Croatia to be located. So under effect of alcohol and unexpectedness that story is pretty much possible
     

    Easy Tiger

    New Member
    Crimean Tatar
    Slightly, but does, for example "бачити" in ukrainian and "видит" in rusyn, or rusyn "єдний" and Ukrainian "єдиний", or ukrainian "дещо" and rusyn "дешто"
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Slightly, but does, for example "бачити" in ukrainian and "видит"
    Standard Ukrainian does have "видіти" (cf. Rus. видеть, Old East Slavic видѣти), even though it's considered dated. "Бачити" (Bel. бачыць, Rus. dial. бачить), on the other hand, is a loan from Polish. Looks more like a random archaicism.
    or ukrainian "дещо" and rusyn "дешто"
    Reflexes of *čьto vary greatly through East Slavic dialects in general. Cf. Bel. што, Russian что [што] and dial. шо < *ščo. Nothing really specific here.
     

    dihydrogen monoxide

    Senior Member
    Slovene, Serbo-Croat
    Standard Ukrainian does have "видіти" (cf. Rus. видеть, Old East Slavic видѣти), even though it's considered dated. "Бачити" (Bel. бачыць, Rus. dial. бачить), on the other hand, is a loan from Polish. Looks more like a random archaicism.

    Reflexes of *čьto vary greatly through East Slavic dialects in general. Cf. Bel. што, Russian что [што] and dial. шо < *ščo. Nothing really specific here.

    You could say baciti pogled in BCS.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    BCS baciti "to throw" is most likely unrelated. The Polish word is supposed to come from mis-analyzing the proto-Slavic/Old Polish *obačiti (from *oko) as *o-bačiti rather than *ob-ačiti.
     
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