Only 253 km to go before your Whopper

shorty1

Senior Member
Korean
Hello.


I came across a comercial in which Burger King disses McDonald's

taken from: Burger King slays McDonald's, shows who's the real boss!
They have a long way to go! The tagline of Burger King said, “Only 253 km to go before your Whopper. Thank you McDonald’s for being everywhere.” The couple are seen enjoying their Whopper as they comment – It was not even so far!

The subject and verb of the part in bold seems omitted.
Could you show me the perfect sentence?

My first try
You only have 253 km to go before your whopper.

My second try
It is only 253 km to go before your whopper.


Thank you very much.
 
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  • shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you very much Uncle Jack and natkretep. :)

    I get it.

    Something curious came up now.

    I'd like to know it is possible to extend this idea to a subway case.

    For exampe:
    dialogue
    A: Excuse me. I'm going to Borough station. Will that be long?
    B: 1)No, you only have three stations to go before Borough.
    2)No, It is only three stations to go before Borough.
    3)No, There are only three stations between this station and Borough.

    In this case, I think 1) and 3) is correct and 2) is wrong becuase a station is not distance like 253 km in the original sentence.

    Am I right?
     
    Last edited:

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    The question really needs "it" rather than "that".
    Answers (1) and (2) are fine and mean the same thing. Don't worry about it not being a distance; your question was about time:) (if you want to ask about distance, use "far").
    Answer (3) adds on an extra station and, while the answer is correct English, it would be an unlikely way of saying it.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    The question really needs "it" rather than "that".
    Answers (1) and (2) are fine and mean the same thing. Don't worry about it not being a distance; your question was about time:) (if you want to ask about distance, use "far").
    Answer (3) adds on an extra station and, while the answer is correct English, it would be an unlikely way of saying it.
    I'll make it clear that I understand correctly.

    Example1
    A: I'm going to Borough station. Will it be long?
    B: No, it is only three stations to go before Borough. (The 'it is only three stations' is accepted as time.)

    Example2
    A: I'm going to Borough station. How far is it?
    B: It is only three stations to go before Borough. (The 'it is only three stations' is accepted as a distance.)


    Did I understand correctly?
     
    Last edited:

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    No. Questions and answers for journeys frequently mix up time and distance, with the question using one and the answer using the other. Of course, if the question is "how far is it" and the person happens to know, they will usually answer in terms of distance, but if they don't they will think nothing of answering in terms of time:
    A: How far is it to Bexhill?
    B: About three miles (if they happen to know) or
    About five minutes' drive or
    Well, it will take you the best part of an hour to walk it.​

    Here, the answer in stations is probably understood in terms of time, irrespective of how the question is asked. On the London Underground, for instance, it is common to regard stations as being two minutes apart, at least in the central area.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    No. Questions and answers for journeys frequently mix up time and distance, with the question using one and the answer using the other. Of course, if the question is "how far is it" and the person happens to know, they will usually answer in terms of distance, but if they don't they will think nothing of answering in terms of time:
    A: How far is it to Bexhill?
    B: About three miles (if they happen to know) or
    About five minutes' drive or
    Well, it will take you the best part of an hour to walk it.​

    Here, the answer in stations is probably understood in terms of time, irrespective of how the question is asked. On the London Underground, for instance, it is common to regard stations as being two minutes apart, at least in the central area.


    Thanks for bearing with me. :)

    Now that's clear thanks to you.
     
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