Open fireplace

Mar3ep

Member
Persian
What does it mean when someone says «open fireplace»?
Is it a special name for an fireplace?
Do They mean a «traditional fireplace»?
Is it any kind of fireplace that is «open hearth»?
Is it a synonym for «Traditional Open-Hearth Fireplace»?
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Open fireplace" is really only used to describe where an open fire would go. An open fire is one that is not enclosed. In other words, it isn't in a stove.

    Some types of range might be regarded as open fires, because the fire is only enclosed on three sides, but a range isn't likely to be called an "open fireplace".

    Here is an example of what I would understand as "an open fireplace". As you can see, it is not particularly open, but it would be used for an open fire:
    1663846104046.png
     

    Mar3ep

    Member
    Persian
    "Open fireplace" is really only used to describe where an open fire would go. An open fire is one that is not enclosed. In other words, it isn't in a stove.

    Some types of range might be regarded as open fires, because the fire is only enclosed on three sides, but a range isn't likely to be called an "open fireplace".

    Here is an example of what I would understand as "an open fireplace". As you can see, it is not particularly open, but it would be used for an open fire:
    View attachment 76861
    Thanks for answering, but I didn't understand 😔
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thank you. It is a place for an open fire, something similar to the picture in post #2. There isn't a stove or a range in the fireplace, for then the person would have said that there was a stove or a range.

    This is what I mean by a stove:
    1663852457522.png


    Here is a range. Ranges used to be used for cooking, and sometimes for providing hot water as well:
    1663852550066.png
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Modern" would generally refer to a modern style of architecture or equipment (remote-controlled electronic lighting of the fire, for example). "Open" refers to the idea that the flames are exposed not closed in / enclosed.
     

    Mar3ep

    Member
    Persian
    "Modern" would generally refer to a modern style of architecture or equipment (remote-controlled electronic lighting of the fire, for example). "Open" refers to the idea that the flames are exposed not closed in / enclosed.
    Thank you 💕
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Where was “open fireplace” sourced? Is it contemporary or from the past?

    I would call here closed examples above as “stoves” (American usage. I don‘t think we call these “ranges”, but we do sometimes call conventional stoves “ranges”.)

    This is a contemporary fireplace with a mesh screen to prevent flying embers. It is the opposite of what I would have thought of an “open fireplace”, but I would not call it “closed” or ”enclosed”.

    industrial-48-3-panel-fireplace-screen-c.jpg

    The screen is not affixed to the fireplace. The design allows it to stand on its own.

    There are fireplaces with the screen attached, but I rarely see them.

    A fireplace with the screen attached (but I would still not call this “closed” or ”enclosed”).
    14421016215582.jpg


    I think fireplace screens are a more recent accessory for fireplaces, which is why I asked originally when this description was supposed to be taking place.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think fireplace screens are a more recent accessory for fireplaces, which is why I asked originally when this description was supposed to be taking place.
    :confused: Even when I was a child, we had fireplace screens. Not only that, we had (and still do have) fireplace doors that closed to become a solid surface of glass and metal.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    By “recent” I should have specified, “in the last 100 years”. In the history of fireplaces, that is “recent”.

    I, of course have no experience prior to 1922, but images I have scene, do not feature those screens.

    My google search. If you eliminate modern replicas, not a screen to be seen.

    fireplaces before 1922 - Google Search
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Is «Traditional open fireplace» another name of it? And, Is it versus modern fireplaces?
    Open fires are old. Tens of thousands of years old. You might add "traditional" to make one sound attractive, but really they are inefficient and incredibly dirty things, as I know from having lived with one as my only source of heat for 14 years at the end of the last century. If you use a word like "modern", it just refers to the styling of the fireplace itself, not to the type of fire. The top picture in post #6 might be called a modern fireplace, as opposed to something highly ornate from the second half of the nineteenth century, or the cast iron fireplace in post #2.

    The words "traditional" and "open" refer to different things. An open fireplace is a place for an open fire: one that is not enclosed behind glass or metal. If the fireplace contains a stove, or if the chimney has been blocked up and the fireplace is just retained as a decorative feature, or if the fireplace now contains a modern gas or electric fire, it can still be called a fireplace, but it is not an "open fireplace". It might be called "traditional", "modern" or something else depending on its styling whether or not it is still used for a fire.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    There is a substantive difference between a truly modern fireplace and even the state of the art fireplaces of the middle of the last century.

    The state of the art “Heatolator” fireplace recirculates the room air through heat chamber. The early versions were passive, later versions used blower motors.

    The problem with conventional fireplaces is that they vent air up a chimney causing a slight negative atmosphere in the house, which in turn sucks cold air from outside.

    Modern fireplaces have (or should have) a separate vent for intake of air directly to the fireplace. This eliminates the cold air rushing into the house.

    Basically an old style fireplace warms one area of the house and chills the rest of the house.

    While Uncle Jack is right, basically all fireplaces are similar. But there are truly modern versions.
     

    Mar3ep

    Member
    Persian
    Open fires are old. Tens of thousands of years old. You might add "traditional" to make one sound attractive, but really they are inefficient and incredibly dirty things, as I know from having lived with one as my only source of heat for 14 years at the end of the last century. If you use a word like "modern", it just refers to the styling of the fireplace itself, not to the type of fire. The top picture in post #6 might be called a modern fireplace, as opposed to something highly ornate from the second half of the nineteenth century, or the cast iron fireplace in post #2.

    The words "traditional" and "open" refer to different things. An open fireplace is a place for an open fire: one that is not enclosed behind glass or metal. If the fireplace contains a stove, or if the chimney has been blocked up and the fireplace is just retained as a decorative feature, or if the fireplace now contains a modern gas or electric fire, it can still be called a fireplace, but it is not an "open fireplace". It might be called "traditional", "modern" or something else depending on its styling whether or not it is still used for a fire.
    Thank you very much
     

    Mar3ep

    Member
    Persian
    There is a substantive difference between a truly modern fireplace and even the state of the art fireplaces of the middle of the last century.

    The state of the art “Heatolator” fireplace recirculates the room air through heat chamber. The early versions were passive, later versions used blower motors.

    The problem with conventional fireplaces is that they vent air up a chimney causing a slight negative atmosphere in the house, which in turn sucks cold air from outside.

    Modern fireplaces have (or should have) a separate vent for intake of air directly to the fireplace. This eliminates the cold air rushing into the house.

    Basically an old style fireplace warms one area of the house and chills the rest of the house.

    While Uncle Jack is right, basically all fireplaces are similar. But there are truly modern versions.
    Thank you very much
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    The problem with conventional fireplaces is that they vent air up a chimney causing a slight negative atmosphere in the house, which in turn sucks cold air from outside.
    That's not a problem, it's a feature, and a desirable one. That's how fresh air gets into the house.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    That's not a problem, it's a feature, and a desirable one. That's how fresh air gets into the house.
    It may not be a problem in drafty old England, but it can be a problem in hermetically-sealed, double-glazed America. I spent a good bit of money for a device that prevents my new range hood from sucking all the air out of the house.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    I took 'open fireplace' to be the kind that is a bowl-like structure on a stem, in the middle of a room, with a matching circular 'hood' at the bottom of a chimney suspended from the ceiling. The fire is built in the bowl-like structure and the smoke supposedly is captured under the hood and goes up the chimney.
     

    Mar3ep

    Member
    Persian
    I took 'open fireplace' to be the kind that is a bowl-like structure on a stem, in the middle of a room, with a matching circular 'hood' at the bottom of a chimney suspended from the ceiling. The fire is built in the bowl-like structure and the smoke supposedly is captured under the hood and goes up the chimney.
    Thank you
     
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