opportunely his sister's friend turned up

Ptak

Senior Member
Rußland
He was looking for someone with whom he could start a love affair, and opportunely his sister's friend turned up.

Does the sentence make sense?
Thank you.
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Not really, Ptak. I'd like your sentence if you deleted "opportunely": 'turned up' already expresses the idea of "by chance".
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Inasmuch as the person is about to do something that does not make sense, the sentence makes sense.

    One idiomatic version would be: "He was looking for someone to have an affair with, and his sister's friend conveniently/fortunately/providentially turned up."

    I should warn you, neither providentially nor opportunely are very common in everyday conversation or, indeed, in most writing. The adjective forms of these words are more common, on the other hand.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Inasmuch as the person is about to do something that does not make sense, the sentence makes sense.

    One idiomatic version would be: "He was looking for someone to have an affair with, and his sister's friend conveniently/fortunately/providentially turned up."

    I should warn you, neither providentially nor opportunely are very common in everyday conversation or, indeed, in most writing. The adjective forms of these words are more common, on the other hand.
    O wise biblio! Yes, conveniently/fortunately/providentially are good here. (But personally, I'd omit the adverb....)
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Opportunely a critic arrived, straight from the late nineteenth century. He declared that the sentence makes sense, and is reasonably idiomatic for that time.

    Biblio's suggested rewrite is idiomatic, but it's not written in the same register, and has a more colloquial tone.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Ah yes, supermod.

    If the sentence is from the 19th century, it makes perfect sense ...
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    It was a dark and stormy night...

    The sentence has an almost Bulwer-Lyttonesque ring to it, sort of like aural heartburn.


    "Ay, in all things and /all places/; eh, Count?" answered the Regent,
    learned how you came so opportunely to our assistance that night. /Dieu
    me damne/! but it reminds me of the old story of the two sisters meeting
    at a gallant's house. 'Oh, Sister, how came /you/ here?' said one, in
    virtuous amazement. '/Ciel! ma soeur/!' cries the other; 'what brought
    /you/?'"*
    Devereux



    "Yea, fear not", spoke the third. Tis the bottommost portion of the fifth frame, and the vaunted Yankees, most opportunely, are
    ahead of the Twins.
     
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    Ptak

    Senior Member
    Rußland
    Hi again! :)

    I have another question about this sentence. Can you say "she turned up to him"? (or maybe "turned him up", although I have doubt it's correct...)

    Thanks!
     

    Ptak

    Senior Member
    Rußland
    Sorry, Oeco, but I didn't understand your reply. I wrote I had doubt about "turned him up", but I asked first of all about "turned up to him".

    What I mean is:
    "she" is who turned up
    "he" is "to whom" she turned up

    For example: I buy him a book. / I buy a book to him.
    "Book" is what is bought...
    "He" is to whom it's bought...
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    She turned up.
    She didn't turn up "to" anyone.
    Possibly, she might have turned up "for" him.

    Similarly, I bought him a book.
    I bought a book "for" him.
    There are some dialect forms of English that would allow "I bought a book to him," but that is better forgotten.

    In the context of this particular sentence, you should leave "turned up" alone.

    While I'm here ...
    I don't think you can omit "opportunely" without changing the meaning of the sentence.
    It may not be the best term to use, but it adds the sense of good fortune to the "turning up".

    You could, of course, say:
    He was looking for someone with whom he could start a love affair, and by good fortune his sister's friend turned up.

    Even better, I think, if you change and to when.He was looking for someone with whom he could start a love affair when by good fortune his sister's friend turned up.
     
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