opportunity is reducing/decreases

contstriver

New Member
Chinese
Hi,

" The opportunity of being employed is reducing/decreases in the current economic environment. "

According to dictionaries, it seems that "sb reduces/decreases opportunity or opportunity decreases, reduction in opportunity" is OK.

But "opportunity is reducing" is not correct.

I am not sure about this.

Thanks.
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    You are correct. :)

    'Reduces' takes an object. Something may reduce the opportunities for employment. A verb that takes an object may also be used in the passive form, so you could say 'the opportunities for employment were reduced.' ] But you cannot use 'reduce' by itself. You cannot say 'the opportunity reduced' to mean that the 'opportunity became smaller.'

    Does that answer your question?
     

    contstriver

    New Member
    Chinese
    'Reduces' takes an object. Something may reduce the opportunities for employment. A verb that takes an object may also be used in the passive form, so you could say 'the opportunities for employment were reduced.' ] But you cannot use 'reduce' by itself. You cannot say 'the opportunity reduced' to mean that the 'opportunity became smaller.'
    Yes, thanks a lot.

    But I have another question.

    Why "decrease" doesn't need to use passive? Is this determined by its usage, grammar or a list of vocabulary?
    I mean if there are other similar verbs like "decrease". Or I just need to remember it.

    Sorry, I am not clear about this.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    "Decrease" can be used both with an object and without an object.

    You can say, 'The opportunities decrease in a bad economy' (no object).
    OR you can say, a "bad economy decreases the opportunities for employment (object ---> the opportunities).

    In English, some verbs use an object, some verbs never have an object, and some verbs can be used both ways. There is no rule that can tell you which kind of verb it is; you have to learn this when you learn a verb.
     

    contstriver

    New Member
    Chinese
    In English, some verbs use an object, some verbs never have an object, and some verbs can be used both ways. There is no rule that can tell you which kind of verb it is; you have to learn this when you learn a verb.
    I get it. Thanks a lot.
     
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