oppose to do / oppose somebody to do /oppose doing

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Senior Member
Chinese
Hello,

I know "oppose" has a structure of "oppose something" and doesn't have a structure of "oppose that clause". Then what about "oppose to do something", "oppose somebody to do something" and "oppose doing something"? Are they idiomatic?
 
  • Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It is difficult to answer with isolated phrases. Please can you give an example of a complete sentence that would include the structure.

    My Example

    John opposed Andrew's decision to sell the car.

    What is your example?
     

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    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hi Biffo,

    Thanks for your reply! My examples would be:
    1. Tom opposes to extend the class size. (oppose to do)
    2. Tom opposes the school to extend the class size. (oppose somebody to do)
    3. Tom opposes extending the class size. (oppose doing)
    4. Tom opposes the extension of the class size. (oppose something)
    5. Tom opposes that the school extends the class size. (oppose that clause)

    In my knowledge, I think #4 is correct and #5 is wrong. But what about the first three?
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi Biffo,

    Thanks for your reply! My examples would be:
    1. Tom opposes to extend the class size. (oppose to do)
    2. Tom opposes the school to extend the class size. (oppose somebody to do)
    3. Tom opposes extending the class size. (oppose doing)
    4. Tom opposes the extension of the class size. (oppose something)
    5. Tom opposes that the school extends the class size. (oppose that clause)

    In my knowledge, I think #4 is correct and #5 is wrong. But what about the first three?

    1. Tom opposes to extend the class size. (oppose to do) :cross:
    2. Tom opposes the school to extend the class size. (oppose somebody to do) :cross:
    3. Tom opposes extending the class size. (oppose doing) :tick:
    4. Tom opposes the extension of the class size. (oppose something) :tick:
    5. Tom opposes that the school extends the class size. (oppose that clause) :cross:

    Reason

    The verb "to oppose" is a transitive verb. This means that it requires a noun, a gerund or a noun phrase as its direct object. The following are possible:

    6. Tom opposes the school's decision to extend the class size.
    7. Tom opposes the school's plan to extend the class size.
    8. Tom opposes the school's extending the class size.
    9. Tom opposes the school's extension of the class size.
    10. Tom opposes the school extending the class size.
     

    popup

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    1. Tom opposes to extend the class size. (oppose to do) :cross:
    2. Tom opposes the school to extend the class size. (oppose somebody to do) :cross:
    3. Tom opposes extending the class size. (oppose doing) :tick:
    4. Tom opposes the extension of the class size. (oppose something) :tick:
    5. Tom opposes that the school extends the class size. (oppose that clause) :cross:

    Reason

    The verb "to oppose" is a transitive verb. This means that it requires a noun, a gerund or a noun phrase as its direct object. The following are possible:

    6. Tom opposes the school's decision to extend the class size.
    7. Tom opposes the school's plan to extend the class size.
    8. Tom opposes the school's extending the class size.
    9. Tom opposes the school's extension of the class size.
    10. Tom opposes the school extending the class size.
    Oh, Biffo, thank you so much for your guidance! I will keep that in mind. I'm just wondering why "propose", which is the opposite of "oppose" but same in word formation, has a slightly different usage? As far as I know, besides "propose something" and "propose doing something", we can have a structure of "propose that clause". For example,

    1. Tom proposes the extension of the class size.
    2. Tom proposes extending the class size.
    3. Tom proposes that the school extend the class size.
     
    Last edited:

    FreidaONeel

    New Member
    Italian
    How about these?
    "Tom opposes to extending the class size" and
    "Tom is opposed to extending the class size"
    instead of "Tom opposes extending the class size" (already mentioned above).

    I'm pretty sure the second one is right but I didn't get whether the active voice can or cannot take the preposition "to" + gerund. Also is there any difference in meaning between the active and passive voice?

    Thank you
     

    FreidaONeel

    New Member
    Italian
    @tunaafi thanks for your reply!
    Can you also tell me if there is any difference in meaning between these two?

    Tom opposes extending the class size.
    Tom is opposed to extending the class size.


    And in general between:

    oppose + gerund
    be opposed to + gerund


    Thank you
     

    tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    @tunaafi
    Can you also tell me if there is any difference in meaning between these two?

    Tom opposes extending the class size.
    Tom is opposed to extending the class size.
    I see no significant difference. The first may suggest that he is doing something about it, the second that this is merely his state of mind.
     
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