Opposite of Collapsible?

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hagpaz

New Member
hebrew
does anybody know a single word what is the oppostie of "Collapsible" - i.e. built by itself (or being built easy by small effort)? many thanks,
 
  • Tatzingo

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    hagpaz said:
    does anybody know a single word what is the oppostie of "Collapsible" - i.e. built by itself (or being built easy by small effort)? many thanks,

    Hi,

    The opposite of 'collapsible' is 'noncollapsible'. I don't know of any word which would mean 'built by itself' this is a very strange idea to me as I can't think of anything that builds itself without having external help...

    Tatz.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Do you mean something that will probably not collapse because it is strongly made, such as an electricity pylon, or do you mean something, such as a piece of furniture which is made to be sturdy and not to be adjusted or "collapsed", like a folding table, for example?
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    How about "easy-to-build" or "easy-to-assemble." Here's a 300 piece easy-to build toy for only $19.99.
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    A word that occurs to me is "inflatable," which is inappropriate for many uses of course.

    Having worked recently with a couple of "easy-to-assemble" tents, whose poles have "shock-cord" connections, I'm convinced that there's not only no word to describe something that assembles with the same ease as things collapse-- there's no such thing.

    Good luck finding just the right word, nonetheless.
    .
     

    Yôn

    Senior Member
    US English
    I would think "expandable" maybe. I was just looking through the thesaurus, and noticed "sprout" has a similar meaning to what you want.

    :eek: WOW! You really beat me to that one. :p
     

    hagpaz

    New Member
    hebrew
    As I can see - the non-collapsible is the only term returned as the opposite, but I need a better word. Collapsible, Like folding is an action made on an assembled product. if folding should be unfolded than it means that the folding is more important the the unfolded product.
    if I need a product to be collapsible, the assembly process should also have a word, and I'm reffering to this word.
    Can anyone help?
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Greetings Hagpaz,
    Welcome to the forums.

    It really depends on the specific item and the context. Opposites might include--

    inflatable
    expandable

    and others. It really depends on the specific qualities and characteristics of the collapsible item in question. Please give us a little context.
     

    daviesri

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The thing with collapsible is there is not an obvious opposite. If you are talking about a "collapsible tent" the opposite would be "assemble the tent" not "uncollapse the tent". What exactly are you writing about?
     

    rsweet

    Senior Member
    English, North America
    I agree with englishman that "rigid" would be more commonly used than "uncollapsible."
     
    hagpaz said:
    As I can see - the non-collapsible is the only term returned as the opposite, but I need a better word. Collapsible, Like folding is an action made on an assembled product. if folding should be unfolded than it means that the folding is more important the the unfolded product.
    if I need a product to be collapsible, the assembly process should also have a word, and I'm reffering to this word.
    Can anyone help?


    Hello again Hagpaz. :)

    I'm sorry we weren't able to help you yesterday with your first post on this topic.

    I've searched the net for the antonym of collapsible. I found nothing other than the word which is not to your liking.

    Answers.com gives
    Meaning #1: capable of collapsing or being collapsed
    Synonym: collapsable
    Antonym: noncollapsible (meaning #1)

    As others have said, some context would be helpful please.

    Thank you.



    Kind regards,
    LRV
    lk
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    hagpaz said:
    As I can see - the non-collapsible is the only term returned as the opposite, but I need a better word. Collapsible, Like folding is an action made on an assembled product. if folding should be unfolded than it means that the folding is more important the the unfolded product.
    if I need a product to be collapsible, the assembly process should also have a word, and I'm reffering to this word.
    Can anyone help?

    Hello hagpaz,
    I answered your other question and indicated that if we know how the item is to be assembled, then we could probably help you.
    You really do need to give us context for this question.

    Imagine I asked for the opposite of "man"…
    person A might reply "woman"
    person B might reply "animal"
    person C might reply "God"
    and
    person D might reply "boy"

    Help us to help you, please.
    Also, it is not normal to start a second thread for a query which you posed less than 36 hours before.
     

    hagpaz

    New Member
    hebrew
    I thiink that's the best answer I've got... Constructible
    la reine victoria said:
    Welcome to WR forums Hagpaz.

    In the context you give I would suggest "constructible". (Such as self-assembly furniture.)




    Kind regards,
    LRV
     

    hagpaz

    New Member
    hebrew
    emma42 said:
    Do you mean something that will probably not collapse because it is strongly made, such as an electricity pylon, or do you mean something, such as a piece of furniture which is made to be sturdy and not to be adjusted or "collapsed", like a folding table, for example?
    I mean that for a folding (i.e. collapsible) the word only describes the product as its folded, as if this is the what's matter, but is there a word describing a product that is being assembled from the folding point.
    it means we have a way of describing only "what's matter in the Trick" and not the reverse manner. I don't know if the non-collapsible describes the trick.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    But the Empire State Building was "constructible", anything is!
    It certainly doesn't mean "built by itself" or easily built by little effort.
     

    hagpaz

    New Member
    hebrew
    cuchuflete said:
    Greetings Hagpaz,
    Welcome to the forums.

    It really depends on the specific item and the context. Opposites might include--

    inflatable
    expandable

    and others. It really depends on the specific qualities and characteristics of the collapsible item in question. Please give us a little context.

    Thanks for the welcome,
    Ufortunatly - I find it logically very problematic to prioritize a certain aspect of a product without having a word to describe the oposite. English (and especially American english) is prioritized very easy. the "UN" or "NON" is very easily joining any word or action. I meant that we need a word to describe two oposite actions with the same prioriy. if folding is in one dirction,(lets call it "x") the unfloding should have a word like "cluster" that will enable it to have the same priority as "y".

    A good answer which I've got from one of the members is "Cosntructible", I belive this gives the same priority (politically correcting the Collapsible from non-collapsible).
    Many thanks though...
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    While constructable may strike you as the best opposite of collapsible, it is a rather unusual word in AE. As Maxiogee has pointed out, most anything may be described as constructible, from a model airplane, to a skyscraper or a bridge. None of these is collapsible, although any of them may collapse.

    Let's begin at the beginning: collapsible. This implies that something may be made smaller, whether by folding, or by unbolting parts, or sliding pieces out from joints. A tent is collapsible. Take down the tent poles and guy wires, and the
    fabric collapses. A parachute is collapsible. Remove the air from within its confines and it collapses.

    You may construct a tent--though the normal word is erect-- but to construct a parachute means to sew the pieces together.

    This is one of those guessing games in which you have something in mind, but won't tell us what it is. That leads to a lengthy, though not particularly useful, thread.

    As others have said, the opposite of collapsible depends heavily on the item to be collapsed. What item do you have in mind?

    If it's a row of dominoes, it may be constructible and collapsible. If it is a balloon, it may not.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    The problem is that you are looking for a single antonym for a word that does not have a single definition.

    The request is itself impossible.

    Without knowing what item in particular you are collapsing, we cannot guess the mechanism of said collapse, and therefore, cannot provide a work for the opposite action.

    Tents "pop up" and collapse.
    Umbrellas "extent" and collapse. EDIT: OOPS. extend.
    Boxes unfold and collapse.

    Get the idea?
     

    hagpaz

    New Member
    hebrew
    maxiogee said:
    Hello hagpaz,
    I answered your other question and indicated that if we know how the item is to be assembled, then we could probably help you.
    You really do need to give us context for this question.

    Imagine I asked for the opposite of "man"…
    person A might reply "woman"
    person B might reply "animal"
    person C might reply "God"
    and
    person D might reply "boy"

    Help us to help you, please.
    Also, it is not normal to start a second thread for a query which you posed less than 36 hours before.

    Hi Again,
    I'm really sorry about the 36 hour delay, I undestand your request for more details, but the oposite of a Collapsible is an oposite of an action and not of a reference or description (as in MAN), the action of collapsing product, means its possible to disassemble it, but without using the "DIS", "UN" or "NON" assembly. I was searching the word that descibes the assembly process politically correct (with your samples - I wanted to find a descriptedword that uses "Man" and "Lady" rather then "NON-MAN" or "woMAN"). Many thanks.
     

    hagpaz

    New Member
    hebrew
    nycphotography said:
    The problem is that you are looking for a single antonym for a word that does nto have a single definition.

    The request is itself impossible.

    Without knowing what item in particular you are collapsing, we cannot guess the mechanism of said collapse, and therefore, cannot provide a work for the opposite action.

    Tents "pop up" and collapse.
    Umbrellas "extent" and collapse.
    Boxes unfold and collapse.

    Get the idea?
    Oh, that's getting interesting as time passes... I belive I was searching for the "pop-up" but in a single word. - yes - tents and any other word that equally describes a rigid body being collapsed or assembled easy, and these two states are valid.
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    hagpaz said:
    Hi Again,
    I'm really sorry about the 36 hour delay, I undestand your request for more details, but the oposite of a Collapsible is an oposite of an action and not of a reference or description (as in MAN), the action of collapsing product, means its possible to disassemble it, but without using the "DIS", "UN" or "NON" assembly. I was searching the word that descibes the assembly process politically correct (with your samples - I wanted to find a descriptedword that uses "Man" and "Lady" rather then "NON-MAN" or "woMAN"). Many thanks.

    With respect hagpaz, one cannot be "politically correct" about an action. Some actions have several opposites - what is the opposite of "walking" —> running -or- standing? Political correctness has its place, but it also has limits!

    We really need to know how your collapsible item collapses, because that will help us to understand how it "constructs" - because it is fairly safe to say that it prrobably isn't "built by itself" as you put it.
    Why won't you tell us how this item cnstructs?
     

    hagpaz

    New Member
    hebrew
    maxiogee said:
    With respect hagpaz, one cannot be "politically correct" about an action. Some actions have several opposites - what is the opposite of "walking" —> running -or- standing? Political correctness has its place, but it also has limits!

    We really need to know how your collapsible item collapses, because that will help us to understand how it "constructs" - because it is fairly safe to say that it prrobably isn't "built by itself" as you put it.
    Why won't you tell us how this item cnstructs?

    Hello maxiogee,
    You are right, but I only thought about the logical aspects of movements. walking is somewhere in between running and standing, and surely then you have sitting, lie-down etc...I'm trying to break the atoms of a word, and the product is a lego-like box, or for better description 6 panels box that is packed (collapsed) and being assembled (pop-up, constructed) again. this action can repeat itself. now - if we take the atom approach - the movement of one atom toward each other is the "construction" and the movement of one atom from eachother is the "collaps", But I was reffering to rigid materials (i.e. - not water) - when they are together - they are constructed.
    thanks again
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Would "reassembled" work here?

    The boxes can be collapsed for ease of storage, then later reassembled for use.

    It is not an exact antonym, but sometimes they are not always the best. This is why every little bit of context is so important!
     
    GenJen54 said:
    Would "reassembled?" work here.

    The boxes can be collapsed for ease of storage, then later reassembled for use.

    It is not an exact antonym, but sometimes they are not always the best. This is why every little bit of context is so important!


    We are on the same wave-length GenJen. :thumbsup:

    I've been searching around for "re-assemblable" as the opposite of "collapsible".

    I have found it in relation to a pavilion, which can be erected and then dismantled for transportation to another location.

    The Mountain Hut is a small scale, pre-fabricated, demountable and re-assemblable pavilion. Source.

    Perhaps we can say that the boxes are collapsible and re-assembleable.



    LRV
    lk
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I've done a bit of googling, in particular on the subject of "rigid 6-sided" boxes, and came upon several instances of "easy to assemble."

    This may be one of those cases where a single word just does not cover the intended meaning sufficiently.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hagpaz,

    You are seeking a logical one to one relationship. The relationship of collapsible to its contrary descriptors is a one to many relationship.


    Positives..................Negative
    erectable----------------collapsible
    buildable----------------collapsible
    inflatable----------------collapsible

    There are dozens more.

    A box can be assembled, by combining paper board and tape. I'm not sure if setting up a collapsed box is assembly, in a strict technical sense, as it is effectively a single piece of cardboard. Our dictionary definition of assemble is "make by putting pieces together;" . Such boxes are broken down and set up. Collapse will work with a box, but I don't believe assemble is the most accurate opposite term.
     

    hagpaz

    New Member
    hebrew
    cuchuflete said:
    Hagpaz,

    You are seeking a logical one to one relationship. The relationship of collapsible to its contrary descriptors is a one to many relationship.


    Positives..................Negative
    erectable----------------collapsible
    buildable----------------collapsible
    inflatable----------------collapsible

    There are dozens more.

    A box can be assembled, by combining paper board and tape. I'm not sure if setting up a collapsed box is assembly, in a strict technical sense, as it is effectively a single piece of cardboard. Our dictionary definition of assemble is "make by putting pieces together;" . Such boxes are broken down and set up. Collapse will work with a box, but I don't believe assemble is the most accurate opposite term.

    OK - I think I was searching for Erectable, which in a single word describes something that after collapsing can be built again. the only porblem I have right now is that one of the synonym of collapsible is "Folding" and I i'm not sure if erectable is also a comon use for "unfolding" (again the "UN" is "UNwelcome")...Many thanks
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Why do you need an antonym?
    Would anyone here not know - immediately - that a collapsible box is also an unfoldable/erectable/a make-it-yourself-in-a-jiffy box?

    And what's actually wrong with "un~" anyway (not that I recommend that)?
     

    hagpaz

    New Member
    hebrew
    maxiogee said:
    Why do you need an antonym?
    Would anyone here not know - immediately - that a collapsible box is also an unfoldable/erectable/a make-it-yourself-in-a-jiffy box?

    And what's actually wrong with "un~" anyway (not that I recommend that)?
    well, I was trying to explain - but it seams that its complicated. there is nothing wrong with "UN", there are lots of words which are single and there for defining them in the opposite will use "UN", "NON" and others. I'm a product designer, and also very much into concrete definition. "easy-to-assemble" is not a single word, its a phrase. a product, which can morph to two states, both of them are useful, will suffer from a description containing only a single word - for example "a boy" will suffer if its called "non-girl". Imagine you have a television that when rotated in 90 degrees will become a chair, will you call the chair "non-TV". the two states are usefull, and in my case - collapsible and eractable are two steady and welcome states. I hope this explains why "make-it-yourself" or "unfoldable" will not do. I'm not certain that erectable will do - since its not describing "unfolding", as much as collapsible is a synonym for flding.
    Many thanks,
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    You still haven't really convinced me of the need for an antonym. English-speakers will understand, as soon as they see it, that collapsible means what you want to convey —> a fold-out box and if you have no objections to hyphens, you could have that one instead. ;)

    Regards.
     

    hagpaz

    New Member
    hebrew
    maxiogee said:
    You still haven't really convinced me of the need for an antonym. English-speakers will understand, as soon as they see it, that collapsible means what you want to convey —> a fold-out box and if you have no objections to hyphens, you could have that one instead. ;)

    Regards.
    Well I actually have objection to hyphens. Like americans use the term "you go down there", which actually means "away from where you stand now", and not "lower then where you stand now". if you design an object, you need to be able to design the name for it. fold-out (maybe to my ears only) is still a phrase joint together. "federal express" became "fed-ex" or "fedex" - but if you will look at "federal" on its own it has load full of contexts. although "fedex" context became so much different that it actuall generaged a new word. I'm looking for that word which will define the "non-collapsible" in a single word, which will not contain the "collaps" inside it. regards
     

    carneybj

    New Member
    English USA
    If not erectible, why not deployable as an opposite to collapsible.
    One can deploy a collapsible tent and then collapse it.
    or
    For totally opposite, rigid, not collapsible.
    or unitized, designed not to collapse?
     

    lizzeymac

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    hagpaz said:
    Well I actually have objection to hyphens. Like americans use the term "you go down there", which actually means "away from where you stand now", and not "lower then where you stand now". if you design an object, you need to be able to design the name for it. fold-out (maybe to my ears only) is still a phrase joint together. "federal express" became "fed-ex" or "fedex" - but if you will look at "federal" on its own it has load full of contexts. although "fedex" context became so much different that it actuall generaged a new word. I'm looking for that word which will define the "non-collapsible" in a single word, which will not contain the "collaps" inside it. regards

    Hi -
    "Erectable" is not a word most people would use in Amercan English.
    For one thing, "erect' would make a more than a few people giggle.

    Erectable is exactly the kind of word ones sees in the instructions provided for something you need to take home & assemble, such as inexpensive furniture from Ikea or Conrans. These instructions are almost always badly translated into awkward English using artifical words & they are a common subject of jokes.

    If it is possible for you to provide more information about the actual object instead of the language concepts that you are relying on, the forer@s would likely be able to provide more accurate & "native-sounding" suggestions.
    You mentioned the idioms used in English, it is the idiomatic nature of English that makes this complicated. If you reject all consideratioins of idiom you will likely create cold, neutral & technical-sounding language, and in any case it will be difficult to use a single word. The language used in a technical manual would be very different from the language used for a consumer product. Perhaps you ought to speak to a marketing consultant - it seems you need this "word" to satisfy too many requirements.

    You reference "you go down there" - Do you mean "go" as in "belongs" - "this piece "goes" here and that piece "goes there"?
    Or the imperative?
    This is very casual teenager-y English - I would not use it unless "down" actually meant lower than, and even then I would point in the direction of "there". It is abrupt & sloppy.

    -
     

    hagpaz

    New Member
    hebrew
    lizzeymac said:
    Hi -
    "Erectable" is not a word most people would use in Amercan English.
    For one thing, "erect' would make a more than a few people giggle.

    Erectable is exactly the kind of word ones sees in the instructions provided for something you need to take home & assemble, such as inexpensive furniture from Ikea or Conrans. These instructions are almost always badly translated into awkward English using artifical words & they are a common subject of jokes.

    If it is possible for you to provide more information about the actual object instead of the language concepts that you are relying on, the forer@s would likely be able to provide more accurate & "native-sounding" suggestions.
    You mentioned the idioms used in English, it is the idiomatic nature of English that makes this complicated. If you reject all consideratioins of idiom you will likely create cold, neutral & technical-sounding language, and in any case it will be difficult to use a single word. The language used in a technical manual would be very different from the language used for a consumer product. Perhaps you ought to speak to a marketing consultant - it seems you need this "word" to satisfy too many requirements.

    You reference "you go down there" - Do you mean "go" as in "belongs" - "this piece "goes" here and that piece "goes there"?
    Or the imperative?
    This is very casual teenager-y English - I would not use it unless "down" actually meant lower than, and even then I would point in the direction of "there". It is abrupt & sloppy.

    -
    Hello - I would say I need a word that describes the two objects:
    it's actually like "erectable IKEA" - but lets say its the type of products "easy to carry" - like the plastic/Aluminum folding table which becomes a suitcase. I think that the more "usefull" (i.e. TABLE) shouldn't be described by its folding state (i.e. CARRY-BOX-WITH-HANDLE). I need the word that better describes the opening state then "unfolding", its like a rose - more interesting when "open", why describing it in "close" terminlogy? Thanks
     

    hagpaz

    New Member
    hebrew
    carneybj said:
    If not erectible, why not deployable as an opposite to collapsible.
    One can deploy a collapsible tent and then collapse it.
    or
    For totally opposite, rigid, not collapsible.
    or unitized, designed not to collapse?

    Hi, I couldn't find dictionary reference for Deploy, but maybe this is the word. would you accept a phrase "the suitcase deplyed into a table"? as valid as "the suitcase unfolded and became a table", or "opened to a table"?
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    The obvious answer is "pop-up." This applies in many areas other than website advertising.

    If you want to coin something, try "erectinflatable." Or "inflaterectable."

    I have a visual image for what you want-- it's time-lapse slow-mo video of a building going up. The cheezoiid way of depcting his anti-collapsive process is to film a detonation-cord implosion demolition project (a casino coming down) and the run the footage backwards.


    Edit, in a more serious vein: Things that "uncollapse" are said to "telescope," and comparisons are also made with other expansive objects like accordions-- "accordion" can be used as an adjective or verb, if pressed hard enough into service. Other things that erect spontaneously or easily are said to "mushroom."

    Another antonym for collapsible is "expandible"-- has that been suggested? A nice creative twist would be "expansible."

    Since most nouns in English cn be used as adjecives, "jack-in-the-box." Something that isn't collapsible could be jack-in-the-boxable. Just a thought., since you took the trouble to ask twice.

    Thrice gets you really fanciful shit. Truths you can't handle.
    .
    .
     

    lizzeymac

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    hagpaz said:
    Hello - I would say I need a word that describes the two objects:
    it's actually like "erectable IKEA" - but lets say its the type of products "easy to carry" - like the plastic/Aluminum folding table which becomes a suitcase. I think that the more "usefull" (i.e. TABLE) shouldn't be described by its folding state (i.e. CARRY-BOX-WITH-HANDLE). I need the word that better describes the opening state then "unfolding", its like a rose - more interesting when "open", why describing it in "close" terminlogy? Thanks

    Fabulous -

    Convertible is a somewhat plain, value-neutral word for Thing A that becomes Thing B.
    A "convertible sofa" pulls out or folds out into a bed for guests, but you have to know what it is converting to.
    Convertible Table/Suitcase is awful, though.

    I own a "convertible" backpack that contains/unfolds to a camp stool, the bag hangs off the side of the stool - I love it.
    It is called a "Convertible Backpack/Stool" on the glossy price tag with pictures showing what is possible. Very plain, not elegant but accurate & I understood what was meant.

    Transform is a much more exciting value-positive word for to change from thing A to thing B.
    It is not specific to the action that changes the object. Unfortunately, there are famous toys in the US called "Transformers" - imagine a cool toy car, you rotate a few pieces & it becomes a cool hi-tech robot.

    Transform-A-Table? Table-To-Go? Blooming Table? (Ick!, this is why I'm not in advertising)
    I know, you hate hyphens, but they both separate and connect the words into understandable relationships & sounds.

    Have you tried Googling the names of the object to see what comes up?
    I Googled & found this:

    The Utimate Rollaboard carry-on travel luggage
    Flightable is carry-on rollaboard travel luggage with convertible table, airline approved size, perfect for clothing, laptop computers, camera, ... http://www.abridgesolution.com/flightable.asp

    Can you see any interesting possibilities of combining the 2 object names - a pun, a word puzzle, a homonym?

    I really like FFB's erectinflatable or inflaterectable - but I still giggle.
    Pop-up is a familiar, value-positive word, friendly & cute.

    I think FFB is onto something with the images - 1- use the vsuals to explain the transformational concept and 2- find a catchy memorable name. It might be easier.

    I hope anything I said was useful, this is a fascinating brain teaser.

    -
     

    adán

    Member
    English, USA (California)
    I think something important that is missing here is the suffix "auto" to indicate self-assembling, so perhaps auto-reconstructing? or automatic self-assembly? it sounds to me as though your trying to advertise a product or something, but from what I gather this seems to be what your looking for
     
    I have used these collapsible, one-piece boxes for sending parcels.

    Printed on them are the words "assembly instructions".

    I can't find "assemblable" in a dictionary, although it does appear on a few internet sites relating to the assembly of this type of box.

    So my shot in the dark is "assemblable".



    LRV
    ?;)
     
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