opposite of eureka

winegrower

Senior Member
I got to wondering what one would call the opposite of Eureka (Εύρηκα!), that is when a situation ends in a total disaster or a complete failure!
My (very amateurish) try would be: ὤλεσα or ὄλωλα, κατώλεσα, απώλεσα (verb:ὄλλυμι).
Any better suggestions from the experts in Classical Greek?
 
  • Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Perhaps "Bummer!", since "Eureka!" is really used as an interjection in English... But the register is all wrong. "Fiddlesticks"?
     
    Last edited:
    I got to wondering what one would call the opposite of Eureka (Εύρηκα!), that is when a situation ends in a total disaster or a complete failure!
    My (very amateurish) try would be: ὤλεσα or ὄλωλα, κατώλεσα, απώλεσα (verb:ὄλλυμι).
    Any better suggestions from the experts in Classical Greek?
    Ὀλώλεκα (since εὕρηκα is the παρακείμενος of εὑρίσκω)
    btw why did Archimedes shout εὕρηκα and not the correct one, ηὕρηκα? :cool:
     

    Nikolaos_Kandidatos

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Ὀλώλεκα (since εὕρηκα is the παρακείμενος of εὑρίσκω)
    btw why did Archimedes shout εὕρηκα and not the correct one, ηὕρηκα? :cool:
    This is an interesting question - I don't know which author reports Archimedes' words, but a quick search on the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae databank seems to yield both forms already for the 4th cent. BC.. I suppose the more koine-ish form lacking lengthening in the initial vowel would be more accurate since Archimedes lived in the 3rd century, assuming his dialect wouldn't make any difference..
     

    markherseytx

    New Member
    English
    Any ideas as to what the opposite of Eureka is in English? The antonym?
    "Excuse my French" but, for the purpose described even though apparently not universally considered an opposite, perhaps "Shit!", or "Damn!".
    often used when one discovers your attempt is not only not your hoped for solution, but also causes a new disaster.

    I beg to differ on whether it's "not the opposite", since it the disaster isn't caused by LOSING an idea, but rather (painfully obviously) NOT finding it!
    And surely NOT finding is also an opposite of finding/found! And yet the on coming disaster usually causes a similar epiphany, assuming the disaster isn't instantly fatal. In fact the verbal silence of an instantly fatal disaster ("...") might be a more complete opposite, since there is no ephiphany, unless perhaps if you believe in an afterlife or real life "do overs" offered by fate mimiccing video games.

    "Fiddlesticks" is hardly emphatic at all, while "Bummer!" is better in that regard but still lacking full feeling of implied epiphany nor of negativity of consequence. Also neither "Shit!" nor "Damn!" nor "Fiddlesticks" nor "Bummer!" do well to imply anything about finding when taken out of context.
    But I think they are all fall on or near the opposite end of the dimension requested by the poser of the question, which seems to be about negativity of consequence and finding versus NOT finding, and not about finding versus losing.
     
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