Opposite of "Upper" Level

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Pizpireta

Senior Member
Spanish, Spain (Valencia)
Hello to all.

I am using the words "Upper Level" to define the level that is just one step up.
Now I need the adjetive for the opposite meaning: the level that is just one step down.

Please, could you help me with this one?
Thank you very much.
:)
 
  • Pizpireta

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain (Valencia)
    Oops.. I wrote "No" instead of "Now"... sorry.. well, in spite of this you understood me! Thank you.
     

    Pizpireta

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain (Valencia)
    Answer to Marget question (Are there only two levels?): No. I explain more:

    There are for instance 10 levels. You are in level 6.
    Then you can only move to the first level going up (5), or to the first level going down (7). You cannot move higher or lower than that.

    To describe the first thing, I used "Upper Level". But I am not sure is correct.
    Upper seems to mean: any of the above levels, but I need an adjetive to describe only the next one up.

    Anyway, if I finally use "Upper", I still need the adjective for "the next one down".

    Thanks a lot for your help.
     

    DesertCat

    Senior Member
    inglese | English
    Pizpireta said:
    There are for instance 10 levels. You are in level 6.
    Then you can only move to the first level going up (5), or to the first level going down (7). You cannot move higher or lower than that.
    If you're talking about physical steps upper and lower work fine. But, if you're talking about a game with levels, this sounds off to me. I'd say the next level and the previous level.
     

    Pizpireta

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain (Valencia)
    It is related to the Company Chart, and employees position in the chart. So this is in work scope.

    But your reply makes me think... maybe previous and next is also applicable. I am considering this option...

    Thankyou DesertCat.
     

    DesertCat

    Senior Member
    inglese | English
    If you're describing the movement, then I'd say up a level and down a level. Though you can refer to management in terms of upper and lower levels.

    P.S. Your earlier description made me think you were describing a game. :D
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The upper level and the lower level are fine when there are two levels.
    You have ten levels.

    The level one step up is a higher level.
    The level one step down is a lower level.

    What you say depends on the context.
    It would help if you gave us an example sentence.
     

    jonn

    New Member
    English - USA
    In the context where you are using it, "upper level" is too vague. It refers to ALL levels above the current level, not just the next higher level. Similarly, "lower level" would be ALL levels below the current level. If you only wish to refer to the level immediately above and the level immediately below, you should refer to them as the "next higher" or "immediate superior" or "immediate supervisor" depending on the actual structure. For the level below, you could refer to it as "next lower" or "immediate subordinate". In these contexts "immediate" denotes the next level as opposed to more than one level removed.
     

    DavyBCN

    Senior Member
    UK - English
    jonn said:
    In the context where you are using it, "upper level" is too vague. It refers to ALL levels above the current level, not just the next higher level. Similarly, "lower level" would be ALL levels below the current level. If you only wish to refer to the level immediately above and the level immediately below, you should refer to them as the "next higher" or "immediate superior" or "immediate supervisor" depending on the actual structure. For the level below, you could refer to it as "next lower" or "immediate subordinate". In these contexts "immediate" denotes the next level as opposed to more than one level removed.
    Wow! While, like other, I agree that upper level and lower level are too vague, the phrases you suggest seem terribly complicated. Next level up or down, or next step up or down work very well for me. Immediate supervisor or immediate subordinate when relating to a staff hierarchy are ok, but not for other types of levels.
     

    marget

    Senior Member
    DavyBCN said:
    Wow! While, like other, I agree that upper level and lower level are too vague, the phrases you suggest seem terribly complicated. Next level up or down, or next step up or down work very well for me. Immediate supervisor or immediate subordinate when relating to a staff hierarchy are ok, but not for other types of levels.
    In AE, I think we say the next grade up and the next grade down. Maybe someone in Human Resources (HR) can clarify this.
     

    Pizpireta

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain (Valencia)
    WOW, I am impressed. What an interesting (and very useful) thread !

    As John said, it has to define the inmediately before and inmediately next.

    According to all your comments, I would say the finalists are:

    -Inmediate Superior Level and Inmediate Inferior Level
    -Level Above and Level Below
    -Next Level Up and Next Level Down
    -Next Higher Level or Next Lower Level

    (...upper and lower are ruled out :) )

    Thank you for everything.
     
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