Oral English and so on.....

ILOVEZNZ

Member
China,Mandarin
1.—You keep on coughing.What's the matter?
—Oh,I've got a cold.Nothing serious,_____
A. yet B.indeed C.though D.anyway

well,I'd like to choose D,what's your opion?

2.-What do you think of this matter?
-This is a matter of ____ important I think.
A.especial B.fairly C.rather D.special

All the answer above has a similar meaning,so I can't make up my mind....:confused:
 
  • Lakeview

    Senior Member
    Canada - English
    pinkpanter said:
    Hi,

    c and a

    By the way, about number 1, when you get a cold or an illness that is not too serious you can say:

    "I'm coming down with cold/going down with cold" (or flu for example)

    I agree with pinkpanter on number 1.

    Number 2 is a bit difficult. The sentence itself seems incorrect, and probably should be "This is a matter of _________ importance, I think." I bet choice D is supposed to be "special". If so, then either A or D would work, in my opinion, though A might be slightly more correct.
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Hi All;

    As the sentences stand now..I agree with the others..
    but to "me"..they are not complete..missing something...

    te gato;)
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    ILOVEZNZ said:
    1.—You keep on coughing.What's the matter?
    —Oh,I've got a cold.Nothing serious,_____
    A. yet B.indeed C.though D.anyway

    well,I'd like to choose D,what's your opion?

    2.-What do you think of this matter?
    -This is a matter of ____ important I think.
    A.especial B.fairly C.rather D.specical

    All the answer above has a similar meaning,so I can't make up my mind....:confused:

    Hi ILOVEZNZ,

    I hope these sentences aren't out of a textbook. :eek:

    The first one I hear frequently as D. "Oh, I've got a cold. Nothing serious, anyway." That would be the most common in spoken English (in my world).

    The second sentence should be rewritten because as it is, it isn't proper. It should be either of these two:

    This matter is fairly/rather important.
    This is a matter of great/utmost importance.

    Does this help?
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    ILOVEZNZ said:
    1.—You keep on coughing.What's the matter?
    —Oh,I've got a cold.Nothing serious,_____
    A. yet B.indeed C.though D.anyway

    well,I'd like to choose D,what's your opion?

    2.-What do you think of this matter?
    -This is a matter of ____ important I think.
    A.especial B.fairly C.rather D.specical

    All the answer above has a similar meaning,so I can't make up my mind....:confused:
    I would choose c for the first, even though d would be commonly heard. "Anyway" is an adverb which actually means:
    * used to indicate that a statement explains or supports a previous statement (Example: "Anyway, it's gone")
    * in any way whatsoever (Example: "Get it done anyway you can").
    "Though" means "however."

    The second question has some problems. As stated already it seems the word would have to have been 'importance" and the last option should have been "special," which is what I would choose.
     

    Lakeview

    Senior Member
    Canada - English
    lsp said:
    I would choose c for the first, even though d would be commonly heard. "Anyway" is an adverb which actually means:
    * used to indicate that a statement explains or supports a previous statement (Example: "Anyway, it's gone")
    * in any way whatsoever (Example: "Get it done anyway you can").
    "Though" means "however."

    The second question has some problems. As stated already it seems the word would have to have been 'importance" and the last option should have been "special," which is what I would choose.

    Agree. But something of "especial" importance can be something of particular importance, and according to Webster's is synonymous with "special". Hence my difficulty in choosing one over the other. "Especial" is not a word normally heard in North America, though.
     

    ILOVEZNZ

    Member
    China,Mandarin
    Greetings,guys!
    To the first question,I've been influenced by certain films so I chose D......
    I'm still puzzled between the two words "especial" & "special",how can I differ them?
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    ILOVEZNZ said:
    Greetings,guys!
    To the first question,I've been influenced by certain films so I chose D......
    I'm still puzzled between the two words "especial" & "special",how can I differ them?
    Hi ILOVEZNZ;
    the only difference between the two.....
    "especial" is an adjective only....
    where as..
    "special" ia an adjective and can also be used as a noun...
    es·pe·cial (
    ibreve.gif
    -sp
    ebreve.gif
    sh
    prime.gif
    schwa.gif
    l)
    adj.
    1. Of special importance or significance; exceptional: an occasion of especial joy.
    2. Relating to or directed toward a particular person, group, or purpose: called his father with especial birthday wishes; gave especial attention to the decorations.
    3. Peculiar to the individual; characteristic: She has an especial fondness for mushrooms
    spe·cial
    (sp
    ebreve.gif
    sh
    prime.gif
    schwa.gif
    l)
    adj.
    1. Surpassing what is common or usual; exceptional: a special occasion; a special treat.
      1. <LI type=a>Distinct among others of a kind: a special type of paint; a special medication for arthritis.
      2. Primary: His special satisfaction comes from volunteer work.
    2. Peculiar to a specific person or thing; particular: my own special chair; the special features of a computer.
      1. <LI type=a>Having a limited or specific function, application, or scope: a special role in the mission.
      2. Arranged for a particular occasion or purpose: a special visit from her daughter.
    3. Regarded with particular affection and admiration: a special friend.
    4. Additional; extra: a special holiday flight.
    n.
    1. Something arranged, issued, or appropriated to a particular service or occasion: rode to work on the commuter special.
    2. A featured attraction, such as a reduced price: a special on salmon.
    3. A single television production that features a specific work, a given topic, or a particular performer.
    te gato;)
     
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