orally vs. verbally

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river

Senior Member
U.S. English
As I have advised you in the past, both orally and in writing, I don’t agree with the version of the facts relating to the possible relocation of . . .

Would "verbal" work as well, here? Is there a distinction between "oral" and "verbal"?

I thought this was discussed before, but I can't find it.
 
  • cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    To me, "orally" doesn't have exactly the right ring in this context. I would choose "verbally," or make specific reference to the conversation, e.g., "As I have advised you in the past, during our telephone conversation of April 3, 2007..."
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    I found this:

    "The word "oral" means by mouth; "verbal" means, simply, in words -- whether by mouth or by hand, spoken or written. When talking about contracts, use oral (not verbal) or written contract." Vocabula Review

    Thank you, C and B.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Orally is definitely better, as you discovered, as it is clearly different from "in writing". "Verbally", however, includes both spoken and written words -- think about it; what in the world would "non-verbal writing" consist of? Pictograms, perhaps? I doubt that is what is being described!
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    There is a distinction between oral and verbal if you choose to make one. But the use of verbally to mean spoken rather than written has a very long pedigree.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    I myself prefer "verbally" in this context, because "orally" makes me think about funny stuff, like medicine and......blah blah blah :D
     
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