Order of pronouns

Kevmeister

New Member
English, US
Hello,
I know most of us have learned that when referring to ourselves and others silmultaneously, we should always place "I" at the end. For instance, "My mother and I are going to the store." However, if I refer to "you" as well, does it matter how I order the nouns/pronouns. For example, is it better to say:
"My mother, you, and I are going to the store." OR
"You, my mother, and I are going to the store."
This is just one of those seemingly insignificant questions that I have to have answered.
Thanks
 
  • GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I tend to use "You, my mother, and I..."
    I don't know why this is. I don't think it is a case of any "rule."
    I simply think it is a matter of my referring to the person I am speaking to first.

     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    I agree that "you, my mother, and I" sounds the most probable - it's the order I would use I think. I don't think you would be strictly "wrong" if you pick any order though.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Is this another academic non-real-world question?
    I can't imagine* ever starting a sentence with any combination of you, I and my mother.
    We are going to the store with my mother.

    * I accept that this could be a failure of my imagination.
     

    Kevmeister

    New Member
    English, US
    Yes, your imagination has surely failed in this instance. I commonly start sentences in this way, and I have heard others do the same.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think it might depend on matters such as; does there need to be any emphasis on a particular person (apart from using an emphatic tone)? Is there a query as to whether mother is coming to the store?

    Well, is mother coming to the store? Who is coming?

    Mother, you, and I

    Although, I would probably say, "Mother, you, and me", because the "I" feels too formal, although "correct".
     

    wordluver

    Member
    English U.S.A.
    GenJen54 said:
    I tend to use "You, my mother, and I..."
    I don't know why this is. I don't think it is a case of any "rule."
    I simply think it is a matter of my referring to the person I am speaking to first.

    I agree with GenJen54. "You" in the dictionary is defined as a pronoun which is used to refer to the one or ones being addressed, and since the word "you" is used in the example sentence, by default, that is the person who is being addressed in this sentence.
     
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