Origin of the term "hot water heater"

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Jim 89

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Sydney, Australia. English
The original thread I started was closed, by I don't understand why, as I'm curious about this. What is the origin of the term "hot water heater"? Why do people call it that when you'd never heat water that's already hot?
 
  • . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    The original thread I started was closed, by I don't understand why, as I'm curious about this. What is the origin of the term "hot water heater"? Why do people call it that when you'd never heat water that's already hot?
    Your first attempt sounded like a diatribe and we like to wait until at least the second post before we enter that zone here.
    Hot water heater is perfectly valid.
    I can use a jug to heat water that is already hot to make the water hotter.
    In a similar vein many hot water heaters are controlled by a thermostat which will heat water that is already hot but not hot enough.

    .,,
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    You might never want to increase the temperature of hot water. Some people seem to disagree, even to the extent of using solar panels to pre-heat the water that goes to their [hot] water heaters. Are they senseless and stupid, or might they have a valid motive?

    I don't know the origin of the expression, but you might contact water heater manufacturers to ask their opinions about it.

    Most water heating devices sold in the US maintain water at a constant temperature. Whether they are electric, or gas or petroleum fired, they re-heat already hot water when it falls below a pre-set temperature. That is hot water heating.
    They also heat cold water when the hot water in the tank is drawn down. So, I suppose you could accurately call those devices any of...

    water heaters
    hot water heaters
    cold water heaters
    hot and cold water heaters

    Those of us who use 'coil in boiler' systems, with no storage tank, generally refer to the water heating system as the boiler, or more commonly, and inaccurately, the furnace.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    If you look for the origin I think you will not find that it is as literal as it appears. It is referring to a heater which will produce hot water and has nothing to do whether the water was previously heated or not, usually it is cold from the storage tank. It is perhaps a superfluous description but it has always been that way.
     
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