Ortus?

Tetina

Senior Member
Greece / greek
Hi! I'm translating a book and inside it refers to the mythical creature "Ortus" which is conected with Phoenix. It would help me more if I knew what ortus means in general (if it means something).

Thanks

P.S. And if by any chance you know something for the mythological existence of Ortus I would appreciate some information on it.
 
  • Saoul

    Senior Member
    Italian
    As far as I know the word "ortus" doens't mean anything in Italian.

    The P.S. was deleted, since any discussion about myths, or pagan gods, or anything similar would go beyond the scope of this forum.
     

    TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Ortus seems to be of latin origin and I can find two meanings:

    The first is "rising of the heavenly bodies"
    and
    "to spring from".

    If I find anything the the myth, I'll PM you.
     

    Parergon

    Senior Member
    Italiano, Italia
    Hope this defition from the Dictionary of Phrase and Fable may help. ;)

    Ortus

    “Ortus a quercu, non a salice.” Latin for “sprung from an oak, and not from a willow” —i.e. stubborn stuff; one that cannot bend to circumstances.
    Source: Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, E. Cobham Brewer, 1894
     

    rocamadour

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hi! I'm translating a book and inside it refers to the mythical creature "Ortus" which is conected with Phoenix. It would help me more if i knew what ortus means in general (if it means something).

    Thanks

    P.S. And if by any chance you know something for the mythological existence of Ortus i would appreciate some information on it.
    Hi Tetina, and welcome!:)
    In Italian we have the word orto, which comes from the Latin hortu(m) and means "vegetable garden". On the other side ortus in latin is the past participle of the verb orior (= to rise, to begin); ortus as a noun can mean "rising", "beginning", "origin".
    Ciao!:)
     

    GavinW

    Senior Member
    British English
    Tetina: There seems to be something wrong with our or your understanding of ortus/Ortus in the context of Phoenix. Additionally, the fact that Phoenix was Apollo, god of the sun, leads one to suspect there may be a link with the supine form of the Latin verb "orior", in some way.

    I'd post the whole sentence/context if I were you. But at this point, unless you are translating directly from Italian, this thread may be more suitable in the new Latin forum (?). Or one of the general forums which discuss culture (including mythology).

    EDIOT: rocamadour: actually, I think it's hortus, not hortum. The way you spelled it made it look neuter instead of masculine. ;-)
     

    Tetina

    Senior Member
    Greece / greek
    Thank you all, you were very helpful and you were right about my explaining too. I was looking for the Latin origin and I thought Italian forum would help. As for Phoenix I mean the bird reburn from its ashes and not Apollon, that's why I think the meanings of "rising" and "spring from" go better.
     

    rocamadour

    Senior Member
    Italian
    EDIOT: rocamadour: actually, I think it's hortus, not hortum. The way you spelled it made it look neuter instead of masculine. ;-)



    Ciao Gavin!:)
    Come hai visto ho messo la "m" tra parentesi perché ricostruendo le etimologie per le voci che derivano dal latino in genere si parte dal caso accusativo mettendo però l'ultima parte della desinenza tra parentesi. Puoi controllare consultando qualsiasi dizionario etimologico: cercando città troverai per esempio Lat. civitāte(m), cercando piede troverai Lat. pĕde(m), cercando raggio troverai Lat. rădiu(m). E così via.;)
    Mi dispiace se ho dato per scontata una cosa che invece avrei dovuto specificare. E chiedo scusa se ho eventualmente creato confusione in qualcuno.
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    Hello Tetina, I think this site will be of interest to you (for other words you may want to reasearch too ;) )
     

    GavinW

    Senior Member
    British English
    ... in genere si parte dal caso accusativo mettendo però l'ultima parte della desinenza tra parentesi.

    Oops! mea(m) culpa(m)!! Sorry, I was showing my ignorance when it comes to etymological dictionaries. I was of course assuming you were trying to express the nominative of hortus. Thank you for the delicacy and tact with which you corrected me. ;-)
     

    rocamadour

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Oops! mea(m) culpa(m)!! Sorry, I was showing my ignorance when it comes to etymological dictionaries. I was of course assuming you were trying to express the nominative of hortus. Thank you for the delicacy and tact with which you corrected me. ;-)
    No problem, Gavin!;)
    We're all here to help and to learn every day something new!:)
     
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