ottoman wax seal translation

matosail

New Member
Bulgarian
Hello. I m interested in what does it say on that wax seal if someone could translate it in English?
IMG_20200113_175231.jpg
 
  • reno33

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    To begin with, you got it upside down. Even if I view it by turning my screen 180 degrees, then the writing is seen backwards and remains unreadable, at least to me. Please fix these problems.....in addition, it would be helpful to know where the object is from or where you acquired it. If it's Ottoman, then the language used might not be Arabic but some form of Turkish.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Welcome to the forum @matosail
    Like Reno33 said, the photo is mirrored (which is natural in a seal) and is upside down, so please post a clearer photo and give us some background information like were you find it or where is it from. Background information usually helps a lot in deciphering and understanding.
     

    matosail

    New Member
    Bulgarian
    IMG_20200114_123331.jpg

    I found it in my grandparents house in my village and im currently writing a book about my village .So the story about it is that near my village around 200 years ago there were ottoman traders living there since 1500's what is today my village so I believe that a name is written on that seal probably a traders name or the man who was in command there.I checked in my local museum and they only had info about them living arround nothing more.The interesting thing is that i have land near where they lived and the more interesting thing is that there is a walnut tree that has been there since the time of that seal and I just thought that maybe that is the name of the man who planted that tree that has been there since arround 1700's.
     

    bamia

    Member
    Dutch
    Apparently the Ottomans used both bin (بن) and the -zade suffix to construct patronymics. Given the fact that you found this seal in Bulgaria it's highly likely that it's Ottoman. If it is Ottoman then I suppose that the most correct transliteration would be Salih bin Cafer, which is the Ottoman/Turkish rendition of this name (Cafer being the Turkish and Ottoman equivalent of Jaafar).
     
    Last edited:

    bamia

    Member
    Dutch
    Yes. The name might have been changed to Dzhaferov later on due to Zhivkov's Bulgarisation policy but you probably knew that already. Good luck with your research and your book.
     

    Wadi Hanifa

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    I don't think it says 'uncle' I think it says الفقير, meaning the 'humble' or 'needful [of God]' in this context.

    I don't know if صالح بن جعفر was an Ottoman subject (that would require expertise in various scripts), but the language is Arabic and the name صالح بن جعفر suggests an Arab trader.
     

    bamia

    Member
    Dutch
    I don't know if صالح بن جعفر was an Ottoman subject (that would require expertise in various scripts), but the language is Arabic and the name صالح بن جعفر suggests an Arab trader.
    That's what I thought at first but بن was used by the Ottomans as well.
     
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