Our challenges in <our><the> body

AmieAmie

Member
Vietnamese
Chicken Soup to (.. name of book) celebrates our body- our physical life, our goals and dreams, our struggles, courage and spirit.
Our challenges in the body test and teach us as we stretch the envelope in sports, work and everyday life; as we sweat and toil to get or stay in shape; as we recover after injury and illness. ( cited from Chicken Soup)

if I change the sentence above into as follows, are these true?

1. Our challenges in OUR body test and teach us as we stretch the envelope in sports, work and everyday life; as we sweat and toil to get or stay in shape; as we recover after injury and illness.
2. Our challenges in the body test and teach us as we stretch OUR envelope in sports, work and everyday life; as we sweat and toil to get or stay in shape; as we recover after injury and illness.
3. Our challenges in the body test and teach us as we stretch the envelope in sports, work and everyday life; as we sweat and toil to get or stay in shape; as we recover after OUR injury and illness.

.
I think that all of them are true but not natural ,right?
Secondly, the original sentence uses "the" bolded above by me . I am wondering if the word implies ones which are specific so then it is difficult for me to understand. Why don't the author use OUR in place of The?
 
  • rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    Welcome to the forum, AmieAmie.
    I doubt if this passage was written by a native speaker of English.
    In general, our is better than the. They are our personal bodies, injuries etc. and not bodies, injuries etc. that don't belong to us.
    1. ...our bodies is best. We've got more than one body between us.
    2. The phrase is push the envelope in the sense of test something to its limits. So the here.
    3. It's better to have nothing - neither a the nor an our. If you want something, then our injuries is better. We don't share an injury between us. Illness is better in the singular because it's more abstract. We can suffer from the same illness.

    (I get the impression that oriental languages don't use possessive adjectives nearly as much as English does. It's my coat even when it's obvious whose coat it is. The coat would mean you don't know whose coat it is. You may hear a doctor say the arm and not his arm etc. But this is a medical style of language which doctors use.)
     
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    AmieAmie

    Member
    Vietnamese
    about the author of this book :
    Jack Canfield
    (born August 19, 1944[1][2]) is an American author, motivational speaker,[3] corporate trainer, and entrepreneur.[4]:453 He is the co-author of the Chicken Soup for the Soul series, which has more than 250 titles and 500 million copies in print in over 40 languages .
    He is born in US
    .hic hic
    What does that mean by the following?
    They are our personal bodies, injuries etc. and not bodies, injuries etc. that don't belong to us
    You mean: the author should write as follows:
    1. Our challenges in our personal bodies test ..... recover after our personal injuries and illness ?
    why bodies, injuries do not belong to us?
     
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    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    Who am I to argue with so eminent an author?
    No. You don't the personal. I meant that things that are a part of ourselves are almost certain to want a possessive adjective and not a the. This includes items of clothing and parts of the body. There's no hard and fast rule that I know of.
    You can hang your coat on the hook.
    They died of their injuries.
    I broke my arm.
    His body was taken to the mortuary.
    Where are my shoes?

    You can add personal for emphasis.
    My personal opinion (although other people may disagree with me) is that...
    This is my personal diary (as opposed to my office diary).
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I think that all of them are true correct but not natural ,right?
    True is the wrong word here (and also in your first question).
    1. ...our bodies is best. We've got more than one body between us.
    2. The phrase is push the envelope in the sense of test something to its limits. So the here.
    3. It's better to have nothing - neither a the nor an our. If you want something, then our injuries is better. We don't share an injury between us. Illness is better in the singular because it's more abstract. We can suffer from the same illness.
    :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
    They are our personal bodies, injuries etc. and not bodies, injuries etc. that don't belong to us.
    Why do bodies, injuries do not belong to us?
    He was pointing out that the sentences in question are about bodies and injuries that do belong to us, not about bodies and injuries that do not belong to us.
     

    AmieAmie

    Member
    Vietnamese
    True is the wrong word here (and also in your first question).

    :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:


    He was pointing out that the sentences in question are about bodies and injuries that do belong to us, not about bodies and injuries that do not belong to us.
    Oh you're such a life saver ! I never see anyone correcting my mistakes in writting before. It is very nice of you to do that.
    and The authors of this book used THE that is not correct grammatically so why do they write that? I wonder if they implies other thorough thoughts.
     
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