Our customers are always (welcome OR welcomed)

ShowTime

New Member
English
HI, I would like to know which is correct:"Our coustomers are always welcome" OR "Our coustomers are always welcomed"
 
  • shaula123

    Member
    Italian
    I think the first one. You can check the first examples on the Longman Dictionary:
    welcome 2 S1 adjective 1 someone who is welcome is gladly accepted in a place : I don't think I'm welcome there anymore.
    a welcome guest
    at
    You're welcome at my house anytime.

    They did their best to make me feel welcome (= make me feel that they were pleased I had come ) .

    2 you're welcome spoken a polite way of replying to someone who has just thanked you for something : "Thank you for your help." "You're welcome."

    3 something that is welcome is pleasant and enjoyable, especially because it is just what you need or want : The trip to Mexico will be a welcome break from work.
    welcome news

    4 be welcome to do something spoken used to invite someone to do something if they would like to : You're welcome to borrow my bike.

    5 be welcome to something spoken used to say that someone can have something if they want it, often because you do not want it : If you want to take the job you're welcome to it!





     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    What are you trying to say with this sentence? That our customers are welcome to enter our store and shop, or that the customers who thank us are welcome, or both, or something else?

    Both are fine in the right context: Our customers are always welcomed, for instance, suggests to me that there is a greeter near the entrance to personally welcome them.
     
    Last edited:

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I think sometimes it's not so clear cut which one to use:

    "Those who would like to sing a song will be welcomed/welcome." (coming from a host inviting people to sing at a party)

    This is how I interpret the two meanings, and I may be wrong:

    "...will be welcomed (by the people there)"

    "...will be welcome (to do so)"
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think sometimes it's not so clear cut which one to use:

    "Those who would like to sing a song will be welcomed/welcome." (coming from a host inviting people to sing at a party)

    This is how I interpret the two meanings, and I may be wrong:

    "...will be welcomed (by the people there)"

    "...will be welcome (to do so)"
    You should realize that you don't have to choose from two sentences: you can make up one that is not ambiguous:

    Those who would like to sing are welcome to do so.
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    You should realize that you don't have to choose from two sentences: you can make up one that is not ambiguous:

    Those who would like to sing are welcome to do so.
    But is my interpretation correct?
    i.e. "Be welcomed" always carry a passive meaning".
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Our customers are always welcome. :tick:
    Our customers are always welcomed. :tick:
    They are grammatically correct, but do not have the same meaning.
    The first means we always allow them to come in.
    The second means that we always greet them when they do come in.
     
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