"Our first visual of the character is in...."

trikkinder

Senior Member
italian
Hi everybody.
I know the word "visual" as an adjective. But here it is used as a noun.

"Our first visual of the character is in...." (The context is a movie)

I looked for definition in English monolingual dictionary but it isn't too clear to me. Could someone help me to understand the exact meaning of "visual" in this sencence?
Thanks in advance
Triks
 
  • AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    "Our first visual of the character is in...." (The context is a movie)

    Triks

    Hi Triks,

    Used as a noun, "visual" is something you can see. It's what you see when it's used as a noun in a sentence.

    In your example, it means the first time you see the character in the movie, the first time they actually appear in a scene.


    AngelEyes
     

    LouisaB

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    Hi, Triks,

    Angel Eyes is absolutely right in what this means - but I would be very careful of using it.

    In TV and film (where I work) this is a technical term - 'visuals' is frequently used to describe the pictures the audience will see. In everyday speech, it would be more usual to say 'our first sight of the character'. In BE, (at least in my experience), to use 'visual' to mean 'sight' would seem strange and rather pretentious.

    I'm afraid I don't know about AE. It may be different there?

    Louisa
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)
    Hi everybody.
    I know the word "visual" as an adjective. But here it is used as a noun.

    "Our first visual of the character is in...." (The context is a movie)

    I looked for definition in English monolingual dictionary but it isn't too clear to me. Could someone help me to understand the exact meaning of "visual" in this sencence?
    Thanks in advance
    Triks

    "Our first visual/sight/view (or even "contact", depending on the context) of the charachter is in ........."
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Triks,

    Since you probably use BE instead of what I use - AE - maybe you should take Louisa's advice.

    It's not unusual at all here in the US for it to be used meaning what you're looking at, what you're seeing.

    For instance, if I were giving an advertizing presentation to a client, I would tell my boss I not only have a written promotional packet prepared, but I was also going to offer visuals, too. That could come in the form of artwork or a video of the product.

    I think we use this word much more often in a business setting than any other.

    It's not uncommon in general, though, either.

    AngelEyes
     

    trikkinder

    Senior Member
    italian
    Thank you a lot, AngelEyes, Nechec and Louisa. I won't use "visual", "sight" is easier for me! :) But now I've got the meaning of the sentence.
    Triks
     

    LouisaB

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    For instance, if I were giving an advertizing presentation to a client, I would tell my boss I not only have a written promotional packet prepared, but I was also going to offer visuals, too. That could come in the form of artwork or a video of the product.

    I think we use this word much more often in a business setting than any other.

    It's not uncommon in general, though, either.

    AngelEyes

    Just to clarify - AngelEyes is right (again!!) in this use of 'visual' in a business context. I'd quite forgotten that, but yes, we'd use it in BE too.

    I don't think we'd use it 'in general' though - it looks as if that's the only difference.

    Oh, and nichec, to answer your question:

    Ohoh who's Nechec

    S/he's probably another

    charachter

    Don't you just hate typos?! :D

    Louisa
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In business we use "visual" a bit differently.

    If, say you are trying to explain something to someone with little success, then you might offer up a "visual". That would be an image of some sort that further clarifies what you are saying.

    It means more than an "image" in that context. It means "an image that tells a story" or "an image that shows how". It expands and clarifies the verbal presentation.

    A good "visual" will provide an "ah ha" moment. That is a moment when a person says, "ah ha, I understand".
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Triks,

    Packard's 100% right. That "Ah, hah!" moment is what all American advertisers yearn to achieve in their print ads, too, not just at the Ad Agency's meeting.

    A good, effective visual is worth a thousand words. :)



    AngelEyes
     
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