ouster/representative expulsion

Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hi, there

I was writting a report about a Brazilian senator who can be removed from office, and I would like to know which title is better:

"CCJ (Justice and Constitution Commission) postpones Delcidio's ouster vote until next Monday"

or

"CCJ postpones Delcidio's parliamentary session on the representative expulsion until next Monday."

Thank you
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Who's your audience, Gabriel? If it includes BrE-speakers, I'd say that relatively few of us would be familiar with the term "ouster". (See this previous thread: Can we oust "ouster"?)
    As regards "expulsion", I was wondering why you'd opted for "representative expulsion" - what makes the expulsion representative? Or did you mean "the senator's expulsion"?
     
    Last edited:

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Who's your audience, Gabriel? If it includes BrE-speakers, I'd say that relatively few of us would be familiar with the term "ouster". (See this previous thread: Can we oust "ouster"?)
    As regards, "expulsion", I was wondering why you'd opted for "representative expulsion" - what makes the expulsion representative? Or did you mean "the senator's expulsion"?
    Yes, I meant "the senator's expulsion"... And "senator's removal from office"? Is that odd?

    Is "ouster" an American word?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    You used "representative expulsion" - an expulsion that is representative of something, not "representative's expulsion."
    Note that in the US government we have the Senate and the House of Representatives so using "representative" for a "senator" might possibly confuse us. :)
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    You used "representative expulsion" - an expulsion that is representative of something, not "representative's expulsion."
    Note that in the US government we have the Senate and the House of Representatives so using "representative" for a "senator" might possibly confuse us. :)
    And the other? The first one? Is that better or worse? Would you use "ouster"?
     
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