Out in the periphery

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kastera

New Member
Japanese
I heard the following sentence in the clip from TED.

"And out in the periphery, there were some that couldn't even fit on the map."

I don't understand the meaning of "out in the periphery".
The two words, "in" and "out" have opposite meanings each other. Why do they come together ?

Could you explain it in another way?
 
  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The periphery is an area. In fact, it's a huge area, likely bigger than the central area (because of the way circles and pi works).

    Like any other area, you can be in that area. Where is that area you are located in? It's out from the center, away from the core of the circle. When you go away from the center of a circle, or a city, you are going "out".

    Ignore the topic and just look at the picture. The periphery is about six times bigger than the core.
    31146
     
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    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Given what has been noted as the somewhat redundant use of "out," you might conceivably read the original statement as "out there, in the periphery."

    With all due respect to the geometry, periphery can be a larger area than that which it surrounds, or it might be a very small area if you choose to define it more as narrower. Neither does periphery imply circular areas, in any case. In a casual usage, as this appears to be, periphery merely means outer areas, away from a notional central area.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Out on the periphery" means in this instance, at the very outer edges of the map.
    Not on the edges, but beyond the edges. The periphery refers to the London Underground network, not the map. If the writer has his dates right, the map being referred to is the top one on this page The History Of The Tube Map (I cannot find an image small enough to insert into this post), but I suspect, from the description, he really means the second map, from 1932.

    Out and in have different meanings. "The periphery" needs a preposition, which could be "in" or "on". However, the writer also wanted to emphasise how far away the periphery is from the centre, so he added "out". This sort of thing is quite common.
     
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    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Not on the edges, but beyond the edges. The periphery refers to the London Underground network, not the map. If the writer has his dates right, the map being referred to is the top one on this page The History Of The Tube Map (I cannot find an image small enough to insert into this post), but I suspect, from the description, he really means the second map, from 1932.

    Out and in have different meanings. "The periphery" needs a preposition, which could be "in" or "on". However, the writer also wanted to emphasise how far away the periphery is from the centre, so he added "out". This sort of thing is quite common.
    I was not aware of the source document when I replied. Having read that, the original map, which was drawn accurately to scale left some of the stations off "at the periphery" [of the map]. The replacement map which completely ignored scale was able to include all the stops. The map below is purported to be from 1932 and predates the "not-to-scale" map that replaced it.

    The red line running towards the left of the page appears to have more stops that are not shown. The green line running towards the right of the page may also have a few stops that are not shown. The periphery would be the very last stops shown; the missing stops would be "beyond the periphery" of the map, or simply "off the map".

     
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