Out jogging or out for jogging

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Abcd123kkk, May 6, 2018.

  1. Abcd123kkk

    Abcd123kkk Banned

    India,Punjab
    Hindi
    My brother's friend comes at our home asking for my brother.He is out. I say:
    My brother is out jogging.
    Or
    My brother is out for jogging.
    Thank you
     
  2. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    :)
     
  3. Abcd123kkk

    Abcd123kkk Banned

    India,Punjab
    Hindi
    So I should use:
    My brother is out jogging.
    Right?
     
  4. heypresto

    heypresto Senior Member

    South East England
    English - England
    Yes.

    :tick: = Right.
    :cross: = Wrong.
     
  5. Lun-14

    Lun-14 Banned

    Hindi
    Hi Hp, it is very strange to know that sentence # 2 is wrong.
    This is how I understand it:
    My brother is out for jogging. => My brother is out [for the purpose of] jogging.

    Compare
    I go out for a walk. => I go out for [the purpose of] a walk.

    For <noun> -> for the purpose of <noun>


    Would you please explain why that sentence is wrong, though it's perfectly clear that the sentence shows the purpose?
     
  6. heypresto

    heypresto Senior Member

    South East England
    English - England
    The equivalent to 'I go out for a walk' would be 'He's gone out for a jog'. This sounds natural.

    'My brother is out for jogging' is not at all idiomatic.
     
  7. Abcd123kkk

    Abcd123kkk Banned

    India,Punjab
    Hindi
    But why does "He has gone out for a walk" sound natural but not " He is out for a walk"?
     
  8. DonnyB

    DonnyB Sixties Mod

    Coventry, UK
    English UK Southern Standard English
    It's just not idiomatic: it sounds odd. :(

    It's fairly obvious what it means, but if you were to say it, you would probably come across as someone whose English wasn't very good.
     
  9. sound shift

    sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Because "to be out for" has other meanings. One of them is "to be intent on".
     
  10. elroy

    elroy Sharp-heeled Mod

    Chicago, IL
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    You could say "He is out on a walk."
     

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