out of sheer spite

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Teixeraf

Member
Brazilian Portuguese
Hi everyone,

I've read in The Little Prince's book: "Flowers love the out of sheer spite." And quite didn't get it. Does it mean they love hurting? They deliberately hurt (people) and love it?

Is really it?

"Out of sheer spite" can be considered an idiom or just and expression?
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think the text reads "flowers have them out of sheer spite," no? The idea of doing something "out of sheer spite" is to do it from motives of pure malice, just in order to displease others.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Please double-check the quotation; it doesn't make sense. Also, do you mean the title of the book is The Little Prince?

    The Newt's sentence doesn't make sense to me either; flowers have what? And "have" or "do"?
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    The original quote had two errors, and SRK's correct quote plus the previous sentence now makes sense.

    It's a figure of speech. Flowers, of course, are not spiteful.
     
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