out-teach: OUT + verbo

La Marchesa

Senior Member
Italian
Qualcuno può aiutarmi a trovare una traduzione adatta per la seguente frase? :
" The nation that out-teach today, will out-compete tomorrow."
La frase in questione è tratta da un discorso pronunciato da Obama, in cui elenca gli obiettivi che vuole perseguire durante il suo mandato presidenziale, tra cui quello di migliorare l'istruzione americana.
Grazie a tutti
 
  • k_georgiadis

    Senior Member
    English (AE)
    The addition of out- to a verb gives the significance of surpassing, excelling, of doing better than somebody else. To out-teach = to do better than others in education, to out-compete = to do better than other countries - the competition - (implied: in technology, business and industry). I think that choosing an equivalent for the verbs in bold should do the trick.
     

    La Marchesa

    Senior Member
    Italian
    What do you think if I use a circumlocution for "out-teach"? I would like to translate in this way: " la nazione che ha il miglior sistema d'istruzione oggi, eccellerà domani."
    Anyway thanks for your exhaustive explanation.
     

    k_georgiadis

    Senior Member
    English (AE)
    What do you think if I use a circumlocution for "out-teach"? I would like to translate in this way: " la nazione che ha il miglior sistema d'istruzione oggi, eccellerà domani."
    Anyway thanks for your exhaustive explanation.
    I think that your proposed solution reflects precisely Obama's core message, albeit in different words.
     

    marcolettici

    Senior Member
    English U.S.
    But why not come closer to his style of phrasing rather than a complete paraphrase...

    Could something along the lines of this also work, or is this wording completely wrong/foreign-sounding in Italian? :

    La nazione che meglio insegna oggi, sará la nazione che meglio competerà domani.

    Thanks.
     

    La Marchesa

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hi Marcolettici, your proposition works it isn't wrong. As you said it is another way to translate it, more close to the english version.
     

    elfa

    Senior Member
    English
    Hi everyone,

    Shouldn't it be "The nation that out-teaches today"? Not sure about the grammar of La Marchesa's original sentence...
     

    k_georgiadis

    Senior Member
    English (AE)
    Hi everyone,

    Shouldn't it be "The nation that out-teaches today"? Not sure about the grammar of La Marchesa's original sentence...
    I agree with you elfa; I wasn't paying attention. Unless the original sentence was the nations that out-teach...
     

    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    But why not come closer to his style of phrasing rather than a complete paraphrase...

    Could something along the lines of this also work, or is this wording completely wrong/foreign-sounding in Italian? :

    La nazione che meglio insegna oggi, sará la nazione che meglio competerà domani.

    Thanks.

    To my ears, it sounds a bit awkward - in italiano una nazione non "insegna", eventualmente "ha un sistema educativo".

    Oppure "che meglio educa", "che meglio istruisce", ma l'uso assoluto, senza un oggetto ( es "i propri giovani" ecc ) , sarebbe anche quello poco naturale.
     

    marcolettici

    Senior Member
    English U.S.
    "Che meglio educa" is what I believe Obama meant. Thanks for the clarification. Even in English the same criticisms could be made, by the way. Nations don't "teach" in English either. Obama's oratory takes certain liberties, poetic license, if you will, to make a more forceful, succinct point.
     
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