outing / go out

openmind

Member
Germany, German
Hi what is the difference between to go out and to go on an outing? Is that to go out means to go to a restaurant, bar or disco while to go on an outing means to take a trip, go for a picnic etc?
Thanks in advance. OM
 
  • elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    openmind said:
    Hi what is the difference between to go out and to go on an outing? Is that to go out means to go to a restaurant, bar or disco while to go on an outing means to take a trip, go for a picnic etc?
    Thanks in advance. OM

    "To go out" simply means to leave your home and do something outside. As you well said, you could go to a restaurant, bar, disco, or anywhere else. "To go on an outing" implies more advance preparation, so yes, a picnic, barbecue, or cookout would be considered "outings" (although you are also "going out.")

    Some examples:

    -What are you doing tonight?
    -Oh, we're probably going out.

    (no specification of where; no advance preparation either)

    -What are you doing tonight?
    -We're going on an outing.

    (this implies that something was planned.)

    I hope this helps! :)
     

    sallyjoe

    Member
    UK English
    In the UK we would associate 'an outing' to a special place like the seaside, a castle or a city that has some speicial interests. We would say bring a picnic some food, but we wouldn't say that a picnic or a barbeque is an outing. We would specify that we are going to a picnic or a barbeque.



    elroy said:
    "To go out" simply means to leave your home and do something outside. As you well said, you could go to a restaurant, bar, disco, or anywhere else. "To go on an outing" implies more advance preparation, so yes, a picnic, barbecue, or cookout would be considered "outings" (although you are also "going out.")

    Some examples:

    -What are you doing tonight?
    -Oh, we're probably going out.
    (no specification of where; no advance preparation either)

    -What are you doing tonight?
    -We're going on an outing.
    (this implies that something was planned.)

    I hope this helps! :)
     

    Tomas Robinson

    Senior Member
    USA, English & Spanish
    openmind said:
    Hi what is the difference between to go out and to go on an outing? Is that to go out means to go to a restaurant, bar or disco while to go on an outing means to take a trip, go for a picnic etc?
    Thanks in advance. OM

    Hi openmind...

    In the U.S., an "outing" is also slang for revealing that someone is a homosexual. "To out" someone is to tell the world that person is gay, usually without their permission :( It comes from "coming out of the closet", to reveal to others one's homosexuality.

    Cheers! :D
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    sallyjoe said:
    In the UK we would associate 'an outing' to a special place like the seaside, a castle or a city that has some speicial interests. We would say bring a picnic some food, but we wouldn't say that a picnic or a barbeque is an outing. We would specify that we are going to a picnic or a barbeque.

    That's pretty interesting, Sallyjoe. Of course, in the US we'd say "associate with" so I'm not at all surprised at this difference! ;)
     

    Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    My Webster's dictionary defines "outing" as:
    1.) An excursion or pleasure trip.
    2.) A walk outdoors: AIRING.


    I am a little surprised by the secondary definition, because to me, taking a walk is something that requires little or no planning. I have always considered an outing to be something that required more planning.

    Sharon.:)
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    The NEW OXFORD Dictionary :p
    OF ENGLISH


    outing

    noun
    1*a trip taken for pleasure, especially one lasting a day or less: they would go on family outings to the movies.
    n*
    a brief journey from home: her daily outing to the shops.
    n*
    informal an appearance in something, especially a sporting event or film: Madonna's first screen outing in three years.
    2*[MASS NOUN] the practice or policy of revealing the homosexuality of a prominent person.

    ORIGIN late Middle English (in the sense the action of going out or of expelling)

    Go out
    +leave one's home to go to an entertainment or social event, typically in the evening: I'm going out for dinner.
    +carry on a regular romantic, and sometimes sexual, relationship: he was going out with her best friend.
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In my small part of the world, an "outing" is just as Tomas has described it. If you say an outing and mean to say an excursion of some sort, you will hear lots of tittering and giggles in the background. I don't mean to offend any gay people who may be reading. I have rarely heard the word outing to refer to a planned or unplanned event.

    To go out is used mainly in "to go out on a date" with someone of the opposite sex (or not). Also, to go out means to leave your house for a while or to go outside.
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    openmind said:
    Hi what is the difference between to go out and to go on an outing? Is that to go out means to go to a restaurant, bar or disco while to go on an outing means to take a trip, go for a picnic etc?
    Thanks in advance. OM
    Yes, that is it exactly.

    You can also "have an outing" as well as "go on an outing". Note that "have an outing" can mean to take a trip, or it can relate to the gate "coming out" definition. "go on an outing" cannot relate to the gay definition.
    We went on an outing in the park. [Tells the reader that you went to the park and did something such as walk around and talk.]

    We went out to the park. [Correct, but it has a different meaning. It says that the park is far away. Oftentimes this also implies that something is special or rare (eg: We do not go to the park very often). In any case, it just tells the reader that you are physically at the park; it doesn't tell about what you did at the park.]

    We had an outing in the park. [Correct, but it could relate to the gay "coming out" definition. "We had an outing" == "We were outed" == "We had our sexuality disclosed"]
     
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