Outing or excursion?

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  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    In this case, they mean the same thing (you specified the context as "in this title")
    Excursion
    • 1 a short journey, especially one taken for leisure.
    Outing

    • 1 a short trip taken for pleasure.
    In your context, there is, as Beryl said, no significant difference..
    Note that it is not always the case that excursion can be rewritten as outing - hence the need for including context.

    Excursion
    • 2 a deviation from a regular activity or course: the firm's disastrous excursion into the US electrical market. ■ technical a movement along a path or through an angle.
    Outing
    2 the practice of revealing the homosexuality of a prominent person.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    In a specific context, it may be standard practice to use one term or the other. For example, when schoolchildren in my area go somewhere as a class - for example, to a zoo - it's always called an outing. The word excursion could describe the activity just as well, but it is never used.
     

    sibu

    Senior Member
    In a specific context, it may be standard practice to use one term or the other. For example, when schoolchildren in my area go somewhere as a class - for example, to a zoo - it's always called an outing. The word excursion could describe the activity just as well, but it is never used.
    Thanks for these comments. So this usage might even be regional.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Thanks for these comments. So this usage might even be regional.
    I think this specific example applies to most, if not all, of the U.S., but as a general statement, you're right. Preferences among words that overlap in meaning are often regional. (A discussion would be off-topic for this thread, but the words for a large sandwich on a loaf of French or Italian bread, and the words for carbonated soft drinks, vary a great deal from region to region in the U.S.)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I think this specific example applies to most, if not all, of the U.S., but as a general statement, you're right. Preferences among words that overlap in meaning are often regional. (A discussion would be off-topic for this thread, but the words for a large sandwich on a loaf of French or Italian bread, and the words for carbonated soft drinks, vary a great deal from region to region in the U.S.)
    Indeed! For a little local nuance, I tend to think of excursions as going further afield/taking longer, in general, than outings. But I have no idea where that came from. The ad in original link at the top of the thread seems to want to make sure that the usages of all their readers are covered, whatever they mean in detail, to maximize the market potential :)
     
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